Close-up: Air Mod’s work in progress

Thought I’d share some photos that Air Mod sent along. They document the steps Air Mod takes in its corrosion-control initiatives. It’s labor-intensive work that’s essential to keeping airplanes alive–especially older ones such as our/your 1963 Debonair. Air Mod president Dennis Wolter told me, “Sure, the interior will look great, but if you had to show people the single most important thing we do around here, it’s this attention we pay to dealing with corrosion. When we’re done with an airplane, it’s good against corrosion for another 20 to 30 years.”

There are also some good shots of the seat buildup and reconditioned interior parts.

Air Mod is also installing an Airwolf Filter Company spin-on filter assembly. This will help keep the engine oil cleaner (the original engine has a screen, not a paper filter), and let us examine the filter element for any particulates at oil-change time.

So here’s a look at the work in progress:

De-gunking the belly, with lacquer thinner, Scotchbrite pads, and a respirator

De-gunking the belly, with lacquer thinner, Scotchbrite pads, and a respirator

Belly clean. Note Reynolds Aluminum name on corrosion-free skins.

Belly getting cleaner. Can you imagine 80 hours of this?

One clean, corrosion-free belly

One clean, corrosion-free belly

 

Inner sides of fusalge show the end product of a thorough cleaning

Inner sides of fuselage show the end product of a thorough cleaning

Belly, finally cleaned up and finished with a coat of zinc chromate

Belly, finally cleaned up and finished with a coat of zinc chromate

Cutting the patterns for the seats. Air Mod has used Garrett Leather for past AOPA sweepstakes airplanes

Cutting the patterns for the seats. Air Mod has used Garrett Leather for past AOPA sweepstakes airplanes

Making the template for the rear seats

Making the template for the rear seats

New, aluminum-reinforced floorboards (foreground) replace the beat-up old plywood ones behind them

New, aluminum-reinforced floorboards (foreground) replace the beat-up old plywood ones behind them

Reconditioned, ergonomically correct seat, waiting for back and headrest covers to be installed

Reconditioned, ergonomically correct seat, waiting for back and headrest covers to be installed

 

Inspected, reconditioned, and painted seat frame, new reinforced seat sling, new foam, and new rollers

Inspected, reconditioned, and painted seat frame, new reinforced seat sling, new foam, and new rollers

 

Airwolf remote-mounted spin-on oil filter, awaiting fire-sleeved oil lines.

Airwolf remote-mounted spin-on oil filter, awaiting fire-sleeved oil lines.

That’s it for now. More to come!

13 Responses to “Close-up: Air Mod’s work in progress”

  1. Joanna Smith says:

    Amazing work guys! Thank you for all the hard work on your/our airplane!

  2. Barry A Blake says:

    Thanks Guys!

  3. tony says:

    what a great job

  4. tony says:

    Thank you Lord for the amazing gift of this plane.

  5. tony says:

    this plane will soon be mine

  6. Tom Schick says:

    Impressive job on interior degreasing and corrosion treatment. It looks like new!

  7. James Morton says:

    Maybe it is just the practial side of me being an A&P, but just why in hell did they mount the filter sideways so when you spin it off you leak oil all over the inside of the cowling? Why couldn’t they have found a way to mount it upright (can down) so when you spin it off you don’t spill any oil? How hard could it possibly be to figure out anyway?

  8. Rich Kemp says:

    An unrelated question. Now that the 2014 Summit has been cancelled, how is the airplane going to be presented?

  9. tony says:

    i want my my plane

  10. Bob Stone says:

    The oil filter is mounted vertically. The picture is rotated.

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