We have a lot of great safety related resources in the industry. If you are flying professionally and have made it to that career goal you set years ago you may be familiar with most of these great resources. However, for reasons I cannot fathom many of these great resources are only introduced after a pilot makes it to his or her career position, whether it is HEMS or another side of the industry. This has to change!

Any HEMS pilot is all too familiar with a risk assessment (RA) tool. In fact, the regulations now require their use. The use of a risk assessment tool is a reminder that every flight has some level of risk associated with it and can sometimes open one’s eyes to previously unforeseen safety culprits. Say what you will, but a properly utilized risk assessment tool can be a tremendous asset when utilized correctly. So, why wait? Why are we waiting until a pilot reaches that first HEMS job at 2,000 or more hours to introduce them to this risk management tool? Why do we have to wait until he hits the 2,000 hour mark to make him safe and professional?

So much time is spent with a new primary flight student on learning to fly that many important facets are being neglected. Any CFI will remember studying the laws of learning and particularly the law of primacy. It states that those things learned first tend to stick with the student throughout his or her flying career. Instead of waiting for 2,000 hours to pass, why not teach the importance of the risk-management process (and tool) from the very beginning? And I do mean from the very first flight; the new student watches the CFI conduct a preflight risk assessment and explains what he or she is doing and more importantly why they are doing it. I have heard of just a couple flight schools utilizing risk assessment tools with students for flight training and I strongly applaud them! Hopefully others will follow suit.

We have other amazing resources for students. The United States Helicopter Safety Team (USHST) does a great job of conducting and providing analysis of helicopter accidents for the purpose of distributing “lessons learned” type of information. This group has produced dozens of nice training bulletins and fact sheets. They should be mandatory reading for any new student. But sadly I am finding that many beginning pilots have no idea what the USHST is. Why wait? CFIs should take the time to introduce the USHST to all of their students. Their website provides mounds of good useful reading material.

Unfortunately air medical related accidents have surfaced on a near regular basis in the United States. Many of the accidents involve inadvertent entry into instrument meteorological conditions. Many in the industry have taken note and developed various mitigation strategies. One of those strategies is an absolutely ingenious concept developed by the National EMS Pilots Association (NEMSPA). This group of highly talented professionals created the Enroute Decision Point (EDP). Simply stated, this concept says that pilots should establish a “trigger-point” when flying in less than perfect weather conditions. Their recent campaign has pushed a “down by 30” concept. This philosophy says that when a pilot finds himself in a deteriorating weather condition that requires him to reduce airspeed by 30 knots it is time to land or turn-around–or go IFR if capable. This is a great concept so, why wait? Why are we as an industry waiting until a pilot reaches the HEMS pilot hour requirements before we teach him this life-saving technique? Inadvertent IMC accidents and are not limited to the HEMS part of the industry.

And finally, Matt Zuccaro and the other fine folks at Helicopter Association International (HAI) have developed the “Land & Live” program. This concept stresses the importance that a pilot should land the helicopter before the situation becomes an emergency, such as in the case of a chip-light, low-fuel, or weather situation. The program has a strong emphasis towards commercial operators to not have a punitive culture for pilots that use good judgment and make the decision to “Land & Live”. This concept may sound like common-sense to many but all too often we read of situations where the outcome could have been entirely different had a pilot used this simple concept. So, why wait? Why not introduce this philosophy very early on in a student’s training?

This article has covered just a sample of the various philosophies and techniques that are being used by the most experienced pilots in our industry. If I haven’t made it clear, we as an industry need to start teaching these and other great safety practices to student pilots very early in their training.