Airport open house draws a crowd in Fairbanks

The opportunity to fly in a small plane, take an “inside the fence” tour of the airport, or to sit in the cockpit of a Boeing 727, drew quite a crowd to Fairbanks International Airport on May 17th.  This year’s edition of Fairbanks Aviation Day was blessed with good weather, and in spite of competition from a dozen competing community events, let approximately 2,000 members of the public experience different aspects of aviation.

ATC controllers coaching “pilots” waiting to “take off” on the mini-airport at Fairbanks Aviation Day. Photo by Ron Dearborn

ATC controllers coaching “pilots” waiting to “take off” on the mini-airport at Fairbanks Aviation Day. Photo by Ron Dearborn

The action started early on Saturday morning—at 7 a.m.—with a the traditional pancake feed, inside the University of Alaska Fairbanks/Community and Technical College Aviation Program hangar.  Almost immediately, families with kids eager to fly started to sign up for EAA Chapter 1129’s Young Eagles flights.  At 9 a.m. the event was in full swing with the Fairbanks ATC controllers operating a 70 by 30 ft. mini-airport, complete with real hold lines, taxiway and runway markings.  Kids, wearing orange vests with individual tail numbers were getting instructions from the “tower” to taxi, take off, and–after a trip around the pattern—cleared to land.  No runway incursions were reported during the 140 “airport operations” that took place during the day.  Meanwhile, exhibitors ranging from flight schools to airlines, military groups and the Alaska State Troopers visited with the crowd.

Future pilot inspecting the controls of a Zenith 750. Photo by Shari George

Future pilot inspecting the controls of a Zenith 750. Photo by Shari George

Outdoors, over two dozen aircraft were on display. These featured everything from old (1929 Travel Air on floats) to the newest aircraft (Jack Schnurr’s Zenith 750 made its first operational flight to participate in the event).  While some airplanes were used “just for fun,” many were working aircraft, which demonstrated some of the roles airplanes serve in a big state with few roads. Tasks included hauling fuel, medevac service, corporate travel, game surveys, forest fire initial attack, parcel delivery and everything in between.

Lining up to see the inside of a Boeing 727, donated to the University by FedEx.

Lining up to see the inside of a Boeing 727, donated to the University by FedEx.

 

Aircraft display viewed from the cockpit of the Boeing 727. Photo by Kevin Alexander

Aircraft display viewed from the cockpit of the Boeing 727. Photo by Wes Ford

 

 

 

 

 

 

Driving a rivet at the UAF/CTC Aviation Program demonstration. Photo by Shari George

Driving a rivet at the UAF/CTC Aviation Program demonstration. Photo by Shari George

Other popular activities included a tabletop flight simulator, courtesy of the Fairbanks FSDO, and a face painting/balloon art station.  Outside the hangar, the Airport Fire Department set up an air-filled slide, along with an impressive array of fire and rescue equipment.  Next to the hangar door, UAF operated a “riveting challenge” demonstration, where anyone could try their hand at driving rivets in a mock wing section.  Indoors, short “aviation sound bites” were going on—15 minute presentations on topics such as the history of the Fairbanks Jenny, air touring opportunities and destinations you could fly from the Fairbanks airport. Civil Air Patrol’s presentation included a two-minute video showing their cadet glider camp operated out of the Clear Airport each summer.  In short, there was something for all ages and interests during the day.

Who makes it happen?
Events like this don’t just spontaneously occur.  A committee of over a dozen people put countless hours of their time into planning this event.  Fairbanks Aviation Day is organized by the Airport Operator’s Council at Fairbanks International Airport.  Over two-dozen organizations sponsor the event by providing the cash, equipment and/or labor to share our passion for aviation with the public.

Sponsors of Fairbanks Aviation Day

Sponsors of Fairbanks Aviation Day

Results
And what did this accomplish? A segment of the public, most of whom don’t fly or work in an aviation field, got a look at something very different from the passenger terminal they normally associate with an airport.  Some went for a flight. Many more got to sit in the pilot’s seat of an aircraft on display.  They interacted with people in aviation businesses and groups that make up the fabric of general aviation.  The food they purchased, buying pancakes for breakfast, or burgers at lunch, brought in about $2,500 that will fund aviation scholarships or safety meetings.  Some of these people will be the next generation of pilots, mechanics, airport managers and air traffic controllers.   You could tell by the looks on their faces!

Valdez Fly In: True Alaska aviation

11 Years and counting. That is the track-record the Valdez Fly In and Air Show established, and continues to uphold.  Something over 275 aircraft from all over Alaska–and from at least as far away as Idaho–converged on the Valdez airport and turned it into a “happening” with tents, campers, families, food booths and a lot of fun.  Most of the aircraft were tail wheel models. Many were supercubs, with big tires, heavy duty landing gear, and other mods to adapt them for back country conditions.  Approximately 2,000 participants watched them perform over the weekend.

Airplanes parked on the ramp at Valdez on Friday night, with more to arrive when the wind dies down.

Airplanes parked on the ramp at Valdez on Friday night, with more to arrive when the wind dies down.

Situated at the end of a fjord, and surrounded by mountains, Valdez is known as the “Switzerland of Alaska” and on the clear days experienced during this year’s fly-in, you can see why.  Weather can be tricky, and this year it was wind that delayed some aircraft from arriving on schedule, cancelled the poker run and caused the STOL competition to get off to a late start.  But that didn’t keep the participants from exhibiting a typical ‘git-er-done’ attitude—which they did!

Paul Claus describes an experience during the off-airport and float plane panel discussion. Other panel members were the Ellis brothers (on the left), Vern Kingsford and Richard Wien (right side).

Paul Claus describes an experience during the off-airport panel discussion. Other presenters were the Ellis brothers (on the left), Vern Kingsford and Richard Wien (right side).

This event has a nice combination of activities for pilots, while at the same time entertaining and educating the public about aspects of general aviation.  Pilots soaked up a presentation by Brady Lane from EAA about how to capture aviation video footage, illustrated with some great examples.  A second pilot session tackled the topics of off-airport operations, and float flying.  A distinguished panel of pilots shared their experiences on these topics: the Ellis Brothers from Nebesna, Paul Claus from Ultima Thule Lodge in the Wrangell mountains, Vern Kingsford who teaches the art of float flying in Moose Pass, and Richard Wien who grew up flying in a pioneering aviation family in Fairbanks.  These aviation veterans had numerous practical tips to offer, and good stories to tell—with a standing room only audience that was hungry for more.

Spectators watching the STOL competition.

Spectators watching the STOL competition.

STOL Competition
Valdez is probably most famous for the Short Take-Off and Landing contest.  Four classes of aircraft compete to see who can make the combined shortest take-off and landing, with distances for each combined to compute a final score.  The full results are available on the show website, but the “Alternate Bush” class winner was Frank Knapp from Palmer, who

Repositioning Frank Knapp's aircraft, that made the shortest take-off and landing of the event.

Repositioning Frank Knapp’s aircraft, that made the shortest take-off and landing of the event.

flew his home-made “Cub X” with a take-off distance of 41 feet, and a landing of only 35 feet.  You had to see it in action. More like a mosquito coming in for a landing!  Knapp, from Palmer, won last year, but over the winter lost his plane to a hangar fire, and had to build a second plane from scratch, in only a few months.  If you want more information on this homebuilt aircraft, check out Brady Lane’s video.  Knapp is also involved in plans for a first ever STOL flight demonstration at Oshkosh this year.

In the “Bush” class (read here, super cubs), young Bobby Breeden from Sterling took that event with a 61 ft take off and 55 foot landing.  Beating his father, Bob Breeden, by only three feet!  A Cessna 170-B took the “Light Touring” class piloted by Shawn Holly of Soldotna, with a take off and landing of 104 and 115 ft respectively.  Finally, the “Heavy Touring” class went to a Helio Courier piloted by Michael Dietz from Big Lake, 118 and 124 foot t/o and landing.  In the “stranger than fiction” department, Chickaloon legislator—Representative Eric Feige—competed in the “Light Touring” class. Take off distance was 172 feet. Landing was 172 feet.  What was he flying? A Cessna 172.  At the banquet, master of ceremonies Joe Prax reported these results with the added quip—“If he’d been flying a C-150, he could have won.”

Aviation History
This year the Saturday night banquet moved from the airport to the Civic Center down town, overlooking the water front.  In addition to STOL results and a sit-down dinner, the audience was transported back the earliest days of Alaskan aviation. Richard Wien, son of pioneer aviator Noel Wien, showed pictures of the early day aircraft and pilots who established many aviation firsts, starting in the early 1920’s.  Richard has a vast collection of photographs, most taken by his father, which recorded some of the early “lessons learned”—like carrying a spare prop for the unexpected forced landing or soft field.

The crowd watches action on the flight line. Families with young children flocked to the event.

The crowd watches action on the flight line. Families with young children flocked to the event.

Bombs Away
Sunday saw a return to the flight line, with Scot Sexton performing an aerobatic routine, balsa wood airplane competitions and the flour bombing contest.  Chuck Miller, flying a WWII vintage Stinson L-13, took first place, placing his flour bomb within 21 feet of the target.  Another impressive demonstration was watching Paul Claus land his turbine Otter land in a few hundred feet, back up under engine power, and then taxi away. While the airplane was not fully loaded, it was carrying a thousand pounds of fuel on board.  By the end of the weekend the crowd had been well supplied with competitions, presentations, demonstrations and food, and ready to declare it another outstanding show of Alaskan aviation.

A big THANK YOU to all the people, businesses and organizations who planned and executed this outstanding event!

Mat Su Valley CTAF Frequencies Change on May 29th

Heads up for pilots who fly in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley. On May 29, 2014 a significant change takes place to the Common Traffic Advisory Frequencies (CTAFs) assigned north and west of Anchorage.  If you aren’t religious about buying new flight charts, or updating your GPS databases, plan to do so with this charting cycle, as approximately 78 airport CTAFs will change on that date.  In addition, 36 airports will have CTAFs assigned for the first time.  In total, FAA is sending letters to 178 airport owners notifying them of the CTAF assignment changes.  Goose Bay, Wolf Lake and Anderson Lake are just three of the airports whose CTAFs will change.  The new frequencies will be found on flight charts, in individual airport listings in the Alaska Supplement, along with a map in the Notices section that shows the “big picture” change taking place.

Background
In the summer of 2011, a number of mid-air collisions occurred in the Mat Su Valley, one with fatal results.  During the subsequent NTSB investigation, it appeared that both pilots involved in that accident had been using what they believed was the correct frequency for the location they were flying—but they were not communicating on the same frequency.  A working group with representation from industry and government was established that fall to look at the published guidance regarding CTAF usage.  Over the past two and a half years, the group methodically examined CTAF assignments, civil and military flight patterns, ATC infrastructure and the results of an AOPA pilot survey.  After agreeing that changes needed to be made, different scenarios for creating “area CTAFs” were evaluated and reviewed by seasoned pilots, commercial operators, flight instructors and pilots based at different area airports.  Like all good Alaska discussions, not everyone agreed with everything, but there was widespread support to reduce the complexity—and overlap—between CTAFs used at different airports and landing areas.  Last fall a set of recommendations was made to the FAA, elements of which will go into effect at the end of May.

New CTAF Areas defined
To eliminate the overlap from adjacent airport frequencies, the FAA is designating new “CTAF Areas” within which, all the airports will be on the same frequency. This concept is not new in Alaska, as the airspace over Denali National Park has had designated “mountain traffic advisory frequencies” for many years.  Cook Inlet and the Knik Glacier areas also have established CTAFs.  On May 29th, there will be four new CTAF area frequencies identified, to let pilots know what frequency to use, if they are not in contact with ATC or a Flight Service Station.  There are corresponding changes to the north boundary of the Cook Inlet CTAF area that become effective at this time.  A diagram showing these areas will be on page 399 of the Notices Section of the Alaska Supplement, however the information is also listed on the FAA’s website  www.faa.gov/go/flyalaska.

Depiction of the Mat Su CTAF Areas that go into effect May 29. Notice that the adjacent Cook Inlet CTAF Area to the sound also has a change in boundary

Depiction of the Mat Su CTAF Areas that go into effect May 29. Notice that the adjacent Cook Inlet CTAF Area, west of Anchorage, also has a change in boundary

How were boundaries selected?
The Mat Su Valley is a highly aviation oriented place. In addition to over 200 private and public airports in the FAA’s database, there are other landing areas (lakes, gravel bars and rivers) that are heavily used either seasonally or on a year-around basis.  The boundaries were designed, as much as possible, to avoid areas where traffic concentrated—along major rivers, at area airports, etc.  Consequently, the boundaries were offset from rivers and coast lines, recognizing that they are often used for navigation when weather is down.  Flight patterns in and out of area airports were also considered, and verified with ATC radar data. During the review process, numerous boundary revisions were made to minimize conflicts with existing flows of traffic along commonly used routes to popular locations.  Ultimately, the beauty of the airplane is that it can go anywhere—weather permitting—so no set of boundaries will meet everyone’s needs.  Hopefully assigning advisory frequencies to different areas will reduce some of the ambiguity experienced previously.

Hi Traffic areas are also depicted within the Mat Su CTAF Areas.  While some are popular airports, others are not shown on flight charts.

High Traffic areas are also depicted within the Mat Su CTAF Areas. While some are popular airports, others are not shown on flight charts.

High Traffic Locations
The working group also identified “high traffic” locations in the Mat Su Valley.  Many of these are airports that already appear on the charts, familiar to us all.  Others are popular lakes, rivers and gravel bars used during fishing season or to access recreational cabins.  These are also depicted on the CTAF Area diagram, along with their names, to let pilots know which CTAF frequency to use when operating to or near these locations.  We hope those locations not charted as airports will eventually become VFR waypoints that may be depicted on FAA flight charts.

Feedback Needed
Any significant change of this magnitude has the potential to solve some problems, and may cause others.  As a result, the working group set up a feedback mechanism to report problems or concerns.  A feedback form has been established on the Alaska Aviation Safety Foundation’s website so that pilots may report problems or ask questions, regarding this change of CTAF architecture.  www.aasfonline.org/feedback  Please let us know if you encounter problems that need to be addressed.  The working group will continue to address other areas, such as the Glenn Highway corridor between Anchorage and Palmer, to consider further refinements in the future.

What can I do?
This is a significant change, a long time in the making.  Please make sure to pick up the May 29th issues of flight charts, the Alaska Supplement, and update GPS databases.  Make it a point to check the CTAF of the place you are flying from and to-especially if you have gone there a hundred times before.  Talk about these changes with your friends and neighbors, to make sure they know about it.

This only works if we truly are all on the same frequency!

May 23rd Update:
Here are two additional documents to help “navigate” the changes to the Mat Su CTAFs.

Mat Su single-sided transition map This document is a single-sided map of the Mat Su CTAF Areas, which also has the high traffic areas combined.  The document size is 11 x 17 inches, in Adobe  PDF format, but may also be printed on 81/2 x 11 inch letter size paper.

 

MatSuValley Airports CTAF Listing  This document lists Mat Su Valley airports, seaplane bases and helipads, their identifiers and assigned CTAF frequency as of May 29, 2014.

Wisconsinites: Telling the Story of A Tax Change

Earlier this week, I had the privilege of speaking at the Wisconsin Aviation Conference in Rothschild. I was joined by Abe Weber from Outagamie County Regional Airport and Jeff Baum from Wisconsin Aviation to discuss the aircraft maintenance tax exemption passed earlier this year and the importance of national and state aviation groups working together to achieve their legislative priorities

But, as I mentioned to the group, advocating for the passage of a bill is only part of our responsibility when it comes to a tax policy change such as the reform in Wisconsin.  Telling the ‘on the ground’ story of the reform is absolutely critical — which is why AOPA has put together a brief survey to collect the impacts the tax exemption is having on the industry.  With the information collected from the survey, AOPA and the several Wisconsin aviation organizations can publicize how the tax reform is benefiting the state through job creation, stronger economic performance, and many other factors.

So, if you are a pilot, aviation business owner, or in any other way impacted by Senate Bill 348 which provides a complete sales tax exemption for the parts used for aircraft maintenance please take a moment to complete the survey and return it to me — I’d really appreciate it! Click on the link below to find the survey.

Wisconsin Aviation Maintenance Aircraft Tax Exemption Survey