Volunteers needed to test Alaska PIREP website

The National Weather Service is looking for pilots willing to test a new enhanced Pilot Report page on the Alaska Aviation Weather Unit’s (AAWU) website.   The AAWU has displayed PIREPs graphically for many years, however recent technical problems lead them to upgrade the page. Fortunately for us, instead of just fixing the current PIREP map, NWS decided to significantly enhance the page. Presently, a “beta” version is available at the link below, with live data. Please take some time over the next two weeks to give it a try and let both NWS and AOPA know how you like it. Most importantly, let us know if the new page does not work on the devices you use.

http://aawu.arh.noaa.gov/index2.php?tab=4

aawu pirep page graphic

A sample showing the new PIREP page, with a zoomable map, and the ability to choose a time-range from one to as much as 24 hours. PIREPs above FL180 are displayed in blue, while lower altitude reports are green.

What’s Different?
The existing PIREP webpage contained a fixed scale map, which covers the entire state. Where there were multiple PIREPs at a single location, it was often challenging to select a specific report. The new site has a map that zooms to larger scales, giving a far more detailed depiction of the report location. NWS kept the ability to filter reports by time. If there are lots of PIREPs in the system, a user can display just the most recent reports. Conversely, you may choose to look at reports over the past 24 hours to evaluate trends. There are still a few refinements that could be made, and we appreciate the NWS inviting us to provide feedback before they declare the site operational.

More on PIREPs
This is one part of a larger aviation community effort to increase the number and quality of PIREPs in Alaska. These reports are a vital component of the information pilots rely on for aviation decision making, and NWS uses to validate aviation forecasts. AOPA and other Alaska aviation organizations are working with the FAA and NWS to examine the PIREP system and to encourage pilots to file more PIREPs. If you haven’t already done so, consider taking the AOPA Air Safety Institute’s online SkySpotter: PIREPs made easy (go to: http://www.aopa.org/Education/Online-Courses/Pireps-Made-Easy), for a refresher on this topic. It is free, available to all pilots.

Expect to see more on this topic in the months ahead, but for now, try out the AAWU’s new PIREP page. Please send your feedback to the AAWU at: [email protected]  and copy AOPA at [email protected].

Cold Temperature Correction Procedures Meeting in Alaska

The FAA’s update to the list of cold temperature restricted airports has generated questions from Alaska pilots about the process. Initially raised at a meeting of the Interior Alaska Flight Instructors Association in Fairbanks, the FAA is sending an official to Alaska from Washington DC to explain and discuss the procedures. Kel Christianson, from Flight Standards Performance Based Flight Systems Branch (AFS-470), will meet with pilots on Wednesday, January 20 at 7 p.m. Mr. Christianson will cover the background on why and how cold temperature correction procedures have been instituted in the National Airspace System, and provide detailed examples on making altitude corrections to instrument approach procedures.

Cold Temperature Correction Procedures apply to nearly 100 airports in Alaska.

Cold Temperature Correction Procedures apply to nearly 100 airports in Alaska.

The Fairbanks based CFI association compiled specific questions from Alaska operators in advance and supplied them to the FAA. A question and answer session will follow the briefing. FAA Air Traffic Control staff will also be on hand to answer questions. The meeting is being sponsored by the FAA Safety Team, and will take place at the Fairbanks International Airport Operations Center, 5195 Brumbaugh Blvd, on the west side of the airport.

Since almost a hundred Alaska airports are on the list, and winter tends to be our dominant season, these procedures may have a major impact on those pilots who fly IFR. Consider taking advantage of this meeting to learn more about this topic.

Possible increase in Alaska aviation motor fuel tax

Alaska is facing a budget crisis due to the low price of crude oil, which will impact all Alaskans, most likely in multiple ways. Focusing on the impact to the 247 state operated airports, the Alaska Aviation Advisory Board (AAB) worked with the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities (DOT) to look at ways to provide additional revenue to support the airports, while having minimal impact on aviation system users. This discussion started back in February this year, when DOT initially announced a proposal to establish landing fees at Deadhorse, a move that many feared would spread to other airports across the state system. In a meeting with Governor Walker, the AAB expressed concerns about landing fees, and asked to work with DOT to look at other options before any changes were made. The Governor indicated he would welcome the board’s input, which kicked off a series of meetings with DOT.

At the spring and summer AAB meetings, DOT presented both the costs to operate the Rural Alaska Airport System, and three alternative methods to increase revenues. DOT also discussed several possible measures to reduce operating costs. These ranged from handing some airports over to local communities to operate, to streamlining the aviation functions of the department into a single division.   Establishing a true division of aviation within DOT is something that a number of aviation organizations, including AOPA and the Alaska Airmen’s Association, have advocated for a number of years. While we believe that streamlining the management of DOT airports will help manage costs in the long run, this doesn’t address the immediate need to keep the airports operating.

What does it cost to operate state airports? Funding for airports comes in two distinct flavors: capital funding, which is used to build and improve airports, primarily comes from the federal government; and operating funding, which covers staffing, supplies and other costs associated with operations and maintenance, which is typically supplied by the airport owner.

Capital Funding:  The State of Alaska, like other states, receives grant money directly from the FAA through the Airport Improvement Program (AIP), to build and expand airports. Alaska has received over $200 million/year for the past several years from this program. The FAA’s contribution is typically about 90% of the grant, with a requirement for the state to match the federal funding. The state’s contribution comes from the airport owner, called the sponsor, in FAA terms. This AIP funding mechanism allows for the construction and improvements of airports nationwide, but comes with strings attached. One of the strings is that the sponsor (airport owner) agrees to pay for operation of the facilities, and to keep them in good working order.

Operational Funding: Funding the operation and maintenance of airports is the challenge. The FAA expects airport sponsors (owners) to pay for operations, and airports typically charge fees to help cover some of those costs. Airport lease fees, tie down fees, and other revenue streams help offset operational costs. In Alaska, even though we rely on aviation for basic transportation, our low population base often doesn’t provide the volume of fees that would be needed for our airports to truly be self-sustaining. Here are the figures for the state-operated airports (not including Anchorage and Fairbanks International, which are operated as a separate enterprise fund). The cost to operate the Rural Alaska Aviation System in FY 2014 was $33.8 million dollars. Revenues received by the state included $5.3 million from airport leasing, tie down permits, etc. and $4.6 million in aviation motor fuels taxes, for a total revenue of $9.9 million. These revenues go into the General Fund. Each year the Legislature appropriates money from the General Fund to DOT, which includes the resources to operate the rural airports.

Revenue Options  DOT presented three options to increase revenues: Implement landing fees, initially at the regional hub (Part 139) airports; implement a state-wide airport user fee, and; increase motor fuel taxes. The AAB looked at these from the standpoint of how much they would cost to implement, the projected amount of revenue generated, what they would cost the users, and how equitable they seemed both to different segments of the aviation community and to the public, which in many cases relies on aviation for the delivery of goods and services, in addition to their own transportation. After considerable deliberation, the AAB recommended that the state increase the aviation motor fuel tax from the current levels (4.7 cents/gal for avgas and 3.2 cents/gal for jet fuel), to 10 cents/gal for both fuel types. Based on projections provided by the state, this would raise about $9 million additional revenue per year. Combined with the current revenue streams, it would provide approximately $19 million of the $34 million needed to operate the rural airports.

A significant motivation for this recommendation is that a change in motor fuel tax doesn’t create any additional cost to state government to collect. Both landing fees and airport user fees require additional administrative efforts to collect, as well as burden the user with tracking and payment. It was also felt that the motor fuel tax was more equitable because cost is proportional to use. Adam White, Government Affairs Manager for the Alaska Airmen’s Association, provided the following information to show the impact to some typical GA users:

Adam White fuel tax table

At a recent meeting in Fairbanks, Governor Walker acknowledged the AAB recommendation. It will take legislative action, however, to make a change to the motor fuel tax. While no one wants to see an increase in operating cost, the motor fuel tax increase option appears to be the best choice to address this issue. We will certainly be discussing it more in the months ahead, and we are interested in hearing your thoughts on funding to keep our airports open, maintained and safe for all aviation operations.

 

This article is reprinted from the January-March, 2016 issue of the Alaska Airmen’s Association Transponder.

Lake Hood Master Plan Alternatives Survey

The Lake Hood Seaplane Base is in the process of updating it’s Master Plan, the document which will guide development of the airport for the next ten to twenty years.  The process involves planning staff and stakeholders reviewing issues, current use and future projections for the airport, and developing alternatives for projects to maintain and/or expand the facility. At this stage, alternatives have been developed, and a user survey is underway to rate the alternatives developed by the planning team.  Options range from maintenance of existing facilities, to candidate projects that could significantly expand the capacity of the airport. For more information about the plan, which is about halfway through a two-year schedule, see the LHD Master Plan website.

Whether you are a local or transient user of Lake Hood, consider taking the online survey, designed to help set priorities for the proposed alternatives identified. The survey has links to color maps, showing the locations of different elements of the plan.  It contains about 50 questions, so you might grab a cup of coffee and prepare to devote a little time to working through the the options.  Click here to take the survey, which runs through December 7, 2015.

lake hood mp graphic

Lake Hood is is purported to be the world’s largest seaplane base, and is the home for some 800 aircraft.  With the water lanes and gravel runway, it serves both seaplane and wheel traffic, often topping 400 operations a day in the summer.  This general aviation airport (exclusive of neighboring Anchorage International Airport) is estimated to have an economic impact of $24 million to the Anchorage community. In addition to being home for private pilots, air taxi operators, maintenance and parts businesses, it has an aviation museum, several government aircraft bases and a Civil Air Patrol maintenance facility. It is also home to the Alaska Airmen’s Association.

If you care about this facility, take a few minutes and provide some feedback to help guide the future of this Alaskan crown jewel.

Heads Up: VIP NOTAM issued for Anchorage

Heads up for pilots flying in the Anchorage area this Sunday afternoon, November 22, 2015. A VIP NOTAM has been posted for the time interval from 2 to 5 pm, limiting flights within 30 nautical miles of JBER. Like the Presidential TFR from last August, there is an inner and outer ring, each with different restrictions.

Remember, the details and times may change, so be sure to check NOTAMs before you take off (and while enroute) for the latest information.  http://tfr.faa.gov/tfr2/list.html

Graphic depiction of the VIP TFR NOTAM. Make sure and check for updates, in case it changes.

Graphic depiction of the VIP TFR NOTAM. Make sure and check for updates, in case it changes.

Book Review: The Wright Brothers by David McCullough

If you have any interest in aviation history, pick up a copy of David McCullough’s latest book: The Wright Brothers, published earlier this year. Having read other books about this famous duo, it was with some apprehension that I opened this latest work.   It didn’t take more than a few pages to become captivated by the story, masterfully woven by McCullough. More so than the other books I am familiar with, this account made it feel like I knew Wilbur and Orville, as well as their sister, Katharine, another key member of the team. How these individuals from a seemingly “normal” middle class family in Dayton, Ohio managed to succeed over others better equipped and financed, is a fascinating tale that goes beyond the mechanics of aviation. This is why McCullough found it a worth story to research and share with the world.

coverThe first part of the book introduces the Wright family in some detail. Much of the foundation that set the course for the Wright Brothers is found there in the form of a rich home environment that provided a well-rounded education. Even though neither brother finished high school, there was “much encouragement to intellectual curiosity” that extended beyond the classroom. Their father, a bishop in his church who spent months at a time away from home, provided a role model that demonstrated both a strong work ethic, and that it was OK to be focused on a mission—even one that might not be popular. Conquering the problem of manned flight was not something that the brothers grew up with, as their interests and talents were quite broad including athletics, music, reading, even cooking.

An event that most likely did lead them to the “aviation question” was of a different nature. During his senior year in high school, Wilbur was struck in the face with a hockey stick, resulting in the loss of most of his upper teeth. This incident and the three-year convalescence that followed changed the direction of his life, causing him to drop plans of attending college. As largely a home-bound recluse, he began to read widely which brought Otto Lilienthal, the German glider enthusiast, to his attention. There are many twists and turns along the way, which McCullough does a masterful job of weaving into the story, making it hard to put down.

Wilbur Wright at the controls over Le Mans, France. This was the location of the first public demonstration of the Wright Flyer aircraft, which made the Wright Brothers famous overnight.

Wilbur Wright at the controls over Le Mans, France. This was the location of the first public demonstration of the Wright Flyer aircraft, which made the Wright brothers famous overnight.

The book fully describes the events leading to the famous 12 second flight in 1903 we celebrate as the “take off” of powered flight at Kitty Hawk. While a significant milestone, it was almost another five years of pain-staking trial and error development that followed before the real public roll-out of aviation. That occurred in Le Mans, France on August 8, 1908. On the track that was used for horse races, Wilbur made the first public demonstration of the Flyer. The French, at the time, were more active in aviation development than the United States, and considered themselves the leaders in this arena. Many believed that the Wright brothers were bluffing with regard to their accomplishments of “controlled flight.” Toward the end of that day, after long and careful preparations, Wilbur took off, flew a simple race-track pattern and landed almost exactly on the spot he had departed. It lasted only about two minutes, but the crowd went wild. Pilots in the audience, including Louis Bleriot, were stunned by the control that had been demonstrated. Overnight, Wilbur’s flight made worldwide headlines. Why this took place in France and not in the US is a fascinating part of the story, which I won’t risk spoiling.

Last week, I heard David McCullough speak about the Wright brothers, and some of the elements that most intrigued him about this story. He credited the home environment, created by their parents as providing the brothers an exposure to the world beyond their hometown. He pointed out that Dayton was the source of many patents at the time, including the invention of the cash register, which became a huge business there. McCullough noted that pre-1903 most of the population believed that manned flight was impossible. Consequently, people that pursued that goal were by definition suspect, if not outright wackos. He also observed that the brothers were able to learn from their failures, yet were not deterred from their quest.

The magnitude of their accomplishments went well beyond figuring out the design of an airplane. Wilbur and Orville taught themselves how to fly—a task that even today is no small undertaking. They realized that aviation was a potentially dangerous activity, which had killed earlier experimenters including German glider enthusiast Otto Lilienthal. Consequently, they implemented risk management practices. The brothers didn’t fly together, so that if a fatal crash occurred one would remain to continue the mission. It wasn’t until a celebration in 1910 that the two brothers flew together, for the first and only time, which McCullough cites as a recognition that they had accomplished their goal.

The Wright Brothers runs to over 250 pages, richly illustrated with photographs, diagrams and documents. It topped the New York Times Best Seller list for multiple months, which suggests that more than pilots are finding this piece of American history worth reading.  If you pick up a copy, be prepared to strap in and enjoy the ride!

 For a brief glimpse of Wilbur Wright flying in Le Mans, France in 1908, check out this short video.

Mat Su Floatplane Facility Survey Underway

Update: Survey deadline extended through November 15.

A user survey is being conducted to evaluate the magnitude of the demand for a new airport/floatplane facility in the Mat Su Borough. As part of a larger Regional Aviation System Plan, the survey is designed to obtain feedback from pilots and aviation business owners regarding the need for a new facility that would support both float and wheel aircraft operations. As follow on to an earlier study, the survey seeks input on three candidate locations under consideration in the southern part of the Mat Su Valley. Questions also ask aircraft owners to rank the importance of different factors to their selection of a place to base their aircraft or business.

The larger aviation system plan looks at other issues such as the economic impact of aviation at state operated airports, the relationship between public and private airports, compatible land use and airports needing master plans. An information sheet lists an overview of the project.

Pilots, aircraft owners and aviation business owners are asked to take the online survey by November 8th.

Fact Sheet 61440 Mat Su RASP – 10_22_2015 matsu rasp phase 2 graphic

KNIK CTAF Area Redesign

Pilots flying in the Knik Glacier/Lake George area have used a Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) for many years, described in a Flight Advisory in the Alaska Supplement. As of October 15, the design of that CTAF area changed in ways that are expected to improve communications in this area. At the same time there are some small changes made to the existing CTAF boundaries around Palmer. This is a result of a continuing effort of a government/industry working group to improve communications and reduce the potential for mid-air collisions in the Mat Su Valley.

Background
The Knik Glacier, northeast of Anchorage, is a popular area for the aviation community to take advantage of the mountains and glacier scenery for flight seeing–and the gravel bars to land on–providing access to this spectacular landscape. Surrounded by mountains, it lacks radar coverage from ATC, or other infrastructure making it like much of Alaska; pilots must look out the window to see other traffic. A number of years ago, FAA assigned 122.7 MHz as the CTAF frequency for pilots flying in the area. Now that the FAA has formally defined the use of CTAF frequencies to discrete areas (in Alaska only), as opposed to just individual airports and landing areas, it made sense to re-look at this popular area and define a specific boundary, especially given the other CTAF areas in use in the Mat Su Valley. A revised CTAF map for the Knik has replaced the old Flight Advisory area in the October 15, 2015 edition of the Alaska Supplement (see Notices section page 412).

Knik High Traffic Areas Defined
The working group also received input from Flight Service and seasoned pilots that fly in this area both for business and for pleasure to define a set of commonly used reporting points, to improve situational awareness for pilots using the CTAF frequency. A rich set of commonly used points was identified, and are incorporated in a joint industry/FAA color map, in addition to the notice in the Alaska Supplement.

The newly defined Knik CTAF Area is shown, along with a set of high traffic locations to help pilots communicate their location relative to this set of landmarks and popular locations.  This map is on the opposite side of the revised Mat Su CTAF map.

The newly defined Knik CTAF Area is shown, along with a set of high traffic locations to help pilots communicate their location relative to local landmarks and popular locations. This map is on the opposite side of the revised Mat Su CTAF map, circulated by FAA and aviation associations.

Other Refinements to the Mat-Su CTAF Areas
Based on feedback from pilots and airport owners, additional changes were made to CTAFs along the Matanuska River. The boundary of the Palmer CTAF Area, which uses 123.6 MHz, was expanded slightly to the north east, to incorporate the Crag Mountain airstrip (52AK). As they were not inside a defined CTAF area, the airports upstream from Crag Mountain were re-assigned to 122.9. A revised version of the Mat Su CTAF Area maps will also become effective on October 15, reflecting the Palmer boundary change.

This image map depicts the revised Mat Su CTAF Areas that went into effect on October 15. The boundaries of the newly defined Knik CTAF Area are also included.

This image map depicts the revised Mat Su CTAF Areas that went into effect on October 15. The boundaries of the newly defined Knik CTAF Area are also included, along with minor revisions northeast of Palmer.

Updated Maps
A revised version of the FAA/industry google earth map has been printed, in both 11 x 17 inch and 8 ½ x 11 inch sizes. One side shows the overall Mat Su CTAF boundaries, and the other side has a larger scale map of just the Knik Glacier area, and high traffic reporting points. Copies should be available from Flight Service, the FAA FAAST Team, Medallion Foundation and the Alaska Airmen’s Association. You may also download your own copy from www.faa.gov/go/flyalaska . The Alaska Supplement has revised charts and descriptions in the Notices Section, and eventually we expect the Anchorage/Fairbanks Terminal Area Chart to be updated with these revisions.

Please pick up a copy of the new map, and help spread the word to your fellow aviators. In addition to these aids, fly with your lights on, and remember that “eyes out the window” is our primary tool to see-and-avoid other aircraft!

Alaska Supplement Notices:

knik supplement notice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mat Su CTAF revised 2015 10 15

 

PIREPs: More Needed…

We need more Pilot Reports! Alaska has the lowest density of aviation weather stations in the country. It would take 2.4 times as many stations as we have today to equal the average density of AWOS and ASOS stations that cover the contiguous 48 states. While the FAA Weather Cameras help, they too are limited in some of the places we need information the most—at choke points on VFR routes. A Pilot Report (PIREP) is a tool in our kit to help fill the holes in our observation network. They only take a little of our time for a brief conversation with ATC or Flight Service as we go about our normal flying activities.

Why so scarce?
During the last two years, several people noticed the lack of PIREPs filed by pilots trying to get to the Valdez Fly In. This is probably the largest VFR fly-in in the state, and both years the weather was challenging. Yet on the Friday and Saturday leading up to the event the number of PIREPs filed was almost zero. I say almost zero, as I counted no reports displayed on the Alaska Aviation Weather Unit’s PIREP page, while Flight Service indicated that they had one in their system. This obviously raised other questions about how reports are distributed, and if filtering is taking place that might limit what a pilot receives, depending on how these reports are obtained. I am pleased to report that the Alaska Flight Service Program not only distributed a questionnaire on PIREPs, but has established a working group with the aviation community and weather forecasters to dig deeper into some of the technical questions surrounding this topic.

Why file a PIREP?
During pre-flight planning, we are trained to look at current weather reports, forecasts, weather cameras, radar and satellite data—where available. While I am instrument rated, my airplane is not equipped for serious IFR operations, so my planning is for a VFR flight. Can I make it through the mountain pass? Will an alternate low-terrain route be open, if I need it? There have been numerous times it came down to a single PIREP that either convinced me to take off—or to bag it. A big thank you to the pilots who filed those reports!

The PIREP you file helps in more than one way. The National Weather Service (NWS) uses them to validate their forecasts. They would like to see reports even if there is not a threatening condition. The lack of turbulence, unforecast precipitation, ceilings and tops reports are all things that would help refine their forecats, as they too are hampered by our sparse weather reporting network.

SkySpotter
To learn more about PIREPs, I took the AOPA’s Air Safety Institute online course, SkySpotter: PIREPs made easy (go to: http://www.aopa.org/Education/Online-Courses/Pireps-Made-Easy) This is an updated version of their original program, which gave me a new set of expectations regarding filing a report. It is free to anyone, and qualifies for FAA Wings Program credits. Consequently the course requires logging into an AOPA account, if you are a member– or setting up a free account (name, address and email) on the Air Safety Institute site. The account allows you to get a transcript of this and other courses you might take in the future.

PIREP Maps
Historically we have obtained PIREPs during pre-flight briefings or inflight from FSS or ATC. Today they are also available in graphic form, which is handy for those of us not familiar with every airport code in the system. In Alaska, the NWS Alaska Aviation Weather Unit http://aawu.arh.noaa.gov/index.php?tab=4 and the FAA Weather Camera website http://avcams.faa.gov/ both have graphic displays of PIREPs that are convenient to see at a glance where you might get some additional weather information.

The National Weather Service Alaska Aviation Weather Unit website’s statewide display of PIREPs, which you may filter to cover different time periods.

The National Weather Service Alaska Aviation Weather Unit website’s statewide display of PIREPs, which you may filter to cover different time periods.

The FAA Weather Camera website now allows users to display PIREPs, in addition to camera location and other aviation information. PIREPs are depicted as yellow circles outlined in red.

The FAA Weather Camera website now allows users to display PIREPs, in addition to camera location and other aviation information. PIREPs are depicted as yellow circles outlined in red.

Please make it a habit to routinely file pilot reports as you fly. It is particularly helpful if you are the first person out along a popular route, or are experiencing a changing weather situation. But also consider filing when you are half way in between surface weather reporting stations. Don’t worry if you can’t remember the exact format—just tell FSS or ATC the weather elements most important to the situation. Those of us still on the ground, or following behind you, will appreciate your efforts!

Aviation Appreciation Month in Alaska

Recognizing the vital role aviation plays in Alaska, Governor Walker declared September as Aviation Appreciation Month. The State of Alaska plays a major part in that it operates about 250 airports that comprise the Rural Airport system. Along with a number of municipally operated airports, these provide the basic transportation network that connects Alaskan communities.

Not included in the 737 registered airports are many back-country airports and landing areas that allow Alaskans and visitors alike to access state and federal lands to recreate, explore, study, manage and enjoy the vast landscapes of the 49th state. Thank you, Governor Walker, for recognizing the importance of aviation!

gov walker press cover

Aviation Appreciation Month

Effective Date: Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

WHEREAS, aviation plays a critical role in everyday life of Alaska’s people and economy; citizens, businesses, industries, and government agencies depend on aviation, often as a primary mode of transportation for travel, medical services, shipment of goods, and tourism; and

WHEREAS, Alaska has more private planes per capita than any other state in the union and, on average, Alaskans fly more than eight times as often as residents of other states; and

WHEREAS, currently there are 737 registered airports and seaplane bases, housing 9,347 registered aircraft utilized by 8,032 active pilots; and

WHEREAS, the aviation industry generates $3.5 billion and over 47,000 Alaskan jobs annually, accounting for ten percent of the jobs in the state;

WHEREAS, the aviation industry in Anchorage generates over 15,000 jobs, or one in ten jobs annually, and over 1,900 jobs, or one in twenty jobs in Fairbanks, having a combined direct annual payroll of nearly $1 billion; and

WHEREAS, Alaska’s airports have over 4,681,000 passenger enplanements annually; and Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport is ranked number two in North America for landed weight of cargo; and

WHEREAS, Alaska has significant and vested interest in the continued vitality of aircraft operations, aircraft maintenance, flight training, community airports, and aviation organizations across our great state.

NOW THEREFORE, I, Bill Walker, GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF ALASKA, do hereby proclaim September 2015 as:

Aviation Appreciation Month

in Alaska, and encourage all Alaskans to celebrate aviation as an important aspect of our the Alaskan lifestyle and to recognize the achievements of those who make aviation possible in the Last Frontier..

Dated: August 18, 2015