Posts Tagged ‘inspire the love of flight’

Daring Greatly: A young aviator’s dream helps fund the dreams of others

Friday, June 27th, 2014
As a young person, isolated and alone, his setbacks, obstacles, and triumphs remind us to prepare for the worst, to expect the unexpected, to fall back on our training, and to reach ever skyward.

As a young person, isolated and alone, his setbacks, obstacles, and triumphs remind us to prepare for the worst, to expect the unexpected, to fall back on our training, and to reach ever skyward.

In this month’s blog I will tell you the back story of Jack Wiegand, a young aviator coming of age in the early 21st century, while circumnavigating the globe alone, and raising tens of thousands of dollars for charity. I also invite you to read “Going Around the World to Find Yourself” in the July edition of AOPA Pilot, which details the psychological implications of such an endeavor on a young person.

Jack Wiegand’s story takes us around the world in a Mooney airplane. But the tale is much more than a travelogue, but rather a blueprint for following your dreams, supporting worthy causes, being fiercely optimistic and drawing on your strength of character.

Jack became aware of the Guinness World Records™ title of youngest pilot to fly around the world and became convinced that he was up for the task. An endeavor of this sort takes a great deal of planning, funding, and the right equipment for the task at hand. Early on Jack decided to donate any fundraising surplus from Solo Flight 2013 to two charities: the Boys and Girls Club and Ag Warriors. This decision isn’t out of character once you know more about the Wiegand family.

Born in Central California’s agricultural heartland, Jack was the third of four children born to Dwight and Irene Wiegand. The family Wiegand was very traditional, tight-knit, and close. These emotional bonds would serve Jack well on his round the world endeavor, alone.

Strong family bond builds character.

Character is forged from family and challenge.

Jack says he was not a great athlete but when, on his 13th birthday, he was given a gift certificate for glider lesson, he found his passion. On his 14th birthday, he became the youngest pilot in the Central California Soaring Club to solo a glider. When Jack was 16, he soloed his first single-engine power plane, and aviation took over where sports left off. He was gregarious, friendly, and handsome and at an early age had a commitment to public service.

Jack departed Fresno, California on May 2nd, 2013 after a four-month training period in N432BG, with an instrument ticket, and 450 total time. In the ensuing weeks Jack would cross time zones, international boundaries/date line and meet head on with many unique psychological challenges, intriguing cultures and foreign customs. His journey highlights the psychological qualities of daring, enthusiasm and commitment to pubic service that he possesses that will serve us all as aviators.

Eight weeks later, on June 29th Jack Wiegand took off for his final destination Fresno Yosemite International Airport. It was a beautiful flight and a time of reflection. As he flew the Mooney by Mount Shasta Jack remembered that in his hardest times in Egypt or Japan he imagined this sight. When he was handed off to Fresno Approach, it was uplifting. “N32BG great to be back with you!” he exclaimed. ATC read a proclamation over the frequency proclaiming June 29, 2013 was Jack Wiegand Day. It was a very emotional flight capping off a monumentally challenging achievement.

Jack landed after completing two low approaches. Two fire trucks made a water canon archway, which he taxied under to the cheers of the hundreds gathered there including children from the Boys and Girls Club he supported. During his eight weeks away and 135.8 hours inflight, Jack set the Guinness World Record™ and supported two charities.

water canon

104 degree weather and water cannons welcome Jack home.

Home

Jack gained a lifetime of experience in eight weeks around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the nine plus hours of interviews, I completed with Jack in preparation for the AOPA Pilot story I can tell you that while he is a remarkable young man, there are numerous take-aways that we can apply to our lives as aviators and citizens.

When I asked Jack what he learned about himself psychologically regarding the trip he said, “Everything is going to be okay. You will be challenged. There will be people who will put you down. As long as you use your head and your heart, you will be okay.”  Daring, enthusiasm and commitment to pubic service are good way points for our life-journey. I would challenge us all to look ahead with these traits. When life throws us some clear air turbulence we must remember Jack’s words, “everything is going to be okay”.

 

Will Fly for Pie!

Friday, May 30th, 2014

 

 1910 Fun

Circa 1910 Airplane Fun

Some pilots have all the fun.  When you think about it, fun is why most of us started flying. According to the National Endowment for the Humanities having fun is a relatively new concept in our nation’s lexicon. In the early twentieth century, the former Victorian ideals of decorum and self-restraint, once prevalent in the nineteenth century, gave way to the notion that “having fun” was good for one’s health and overall well being.

Cheap Suits in formation

Circa 2014 Airplane Fun

The Cheap Suits Flying Club exemplifies fun.  Recently I got a chance to talk to Joe Borzelleri, the co-founder of the flying club.  He was thrilled to tell me about the origins of the club, and how he believes that social flying clubs can impact General Aviation in a positive way.  “We are a bunch of guys and gals in Northern and Central California who fly high drag, low speed airplanes. Our mission statement: “We Fly for Pie!” We are known as the “Cheap Suit” Flying Club. This IS the most fun flying club in the history of ever,” says Joe.

Joe Borzelleri and John "Cabi" Cabigas Founders

Joe Borzelleri and John “Cabi” Cabigas,  Founders

This “flying club”, which started out very much tongue in cheek, was meant to be fun from the get go. Joe says, “In the beginning it was my good J-3 Cub buddy, John (Cabi) Cabigas, and me. It was not meant to be a formal club and it still is not. There are no regular meetings, no by-laws, no board of directors, no dues and no rules. The name Cheap Suit came about when Cabi suggested the use of a VHF interplane frequency that approximated the price of an inexpensive suit.”

Not long after, Cabi shared a logo to use.  Joe designed the front of the shirt to have the look of a cheap brown leisure suit. Soon, both designs were on t-shirts and with that, they were a fully functioning club with a flight suit!

Soon a Facebook “Cheap Suit” page was created. That’s when things really took off. Cheap Suits began to post their fly outs and other shenanigans on Facebook. It didn’t take long to have a large following. Cubs, Colts, C-120s/140s and other fabric-covered fun performance airplanes, soon joined them.

Cheap Suits Flight Suit

Cheap Suits Flight Suit

Cabi has taught many of the Suits the finer points of flying safely in formation. They also have participated in several memorial missing man formations for other aviators who have gone west.

About two years into the “Cheap Suits” flying club’s tenure, Joe began to pursue the idea of taking over the day-to-day management of his home airport, Sutter County (O52).  He says, “I was inspired by you and Mitch and the Friends of Oceano Airport (L52,) to get out there to do something to keep my airport open and affordable. The group of pilots involved in the organization are very passionate and love their home airport. I was thinking that if we could organize a bunch of guys to go get a $100 burger nearly every weekend, we might be able to form a legitimate organization and come up with a plan to run our airport.”

By utilizing social media, email and posters, they were able to organize a large group of local pilots and aircraft owners to form a non-profit organization. With the help of the California Pilot’s Association they did just that.  It has been a little over 2 years since that first meeting, and the Sutter Buttes Regional Aviation Association, will take over the management of the Sutter County Airport (O52) on July 1st, 2014!  “It was a road paved with red tape, and we couldn’t have not done it without the help of Stephen Whitmarsh of SBRAA, Cal Pilot’s Jay White, Bill Dunn and John Pfeifer of AOPA, along with Corl Leach and Bill Turpie of the Lincoln Regional Pilot’s Association, Harrison Gibbs of the Turlock Regional Aviation Association and Geoff Logan of Business Aviation Insurance Services, Inc.” says Joe.

Sutter Buttes Regional Aviation Association

Sutter Buttes Regional Aviation Association

The “Cheap Suits” Flying Club has been around for 5 years now. During this time they have flown to over 100 fly outs and airshows, and have flown thousands of miles, in close formation. The Suits have eaten a million dollars’ worth of burgers and pie, formed a non-profit airport management group and created many close friendships with other airplane people. What they do isn’t so much about airplanes, though. It’s about fun times, flying memories, shredded toilet paper, river runs, making lifetime friendships, helping friends in need, and hanging out with people who love life.  Maybe a story like this will inspire you to do something fun at your home ‘drome.  After all if they knew in 1900s that fun was “good for one’s health and well-being,” who are we to argue?

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cheap-Suits-Flying-Club/141010646601

http://www.sutterbuttesaviation.org/

http://www.CalPilots.org

Community Events Make Airport Good Neighbor pt. 2

Friday, April 4th, 2014

 

Fight to keep your airport an airport

Engage to keep your airport an airport!

Last month we talked about airport days, charitable events such as Toys for Tots, and Fly-In Movie Night as ways to get the public out to your local airport.  This month we will follow up with part two focusing on some more complex strategies that will yield even better results.

Young Aviator Camp: Approach your local YMCA, Parks and Recreation, or Boys and Girls Club and ask about putting on a day camp for children.  Most airports have a green space, campground or empty hangar that can be used as a classroom area. Topics could include: What is General Aviation?, Fundamentals of Flight, Basic Navigation, Mechanics, How to Become a Pilot, Careers in Aviation, and Charitable Flying.

Young Eagles: EAA chapters have a tremendous amount of impact on the youth in our local communities when they hold a Young Eagles day. EAA Chapter 92’s Robert Baker reports on their recent Saturday event, “Fantastic day at Chino today. Beautiful weather, beautiful kids and parents, the beautiful Planes of Fame Air Museum and especially our awesome beautiful EAA 92 Ground Crew and Pilots. We really showed our passion for aviation, educating and flying over 60 Young Eagles and chapter friends.” You will be tired after a day-long event like this, that takes weeks to plan. But you will be what I call “happy-tired.”

Young Eagle Ground School

Young Eagle Ground School

Public Radio and Television: Public radio and television are oftentimes overlooked by those of us in general aviation, yet they are constantly on the look out for community based stories.  Why not contact your local station about an upcoming event at your airport?  EAA 92 mentioned above, had their Young Eagles event filmed for an upcoming segment on PBS.

4-H Aero, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts: Both Boy and Girl Scouts have merit badges in Aviation.  Why not offer a daylong workshop to help the kids get their badges?

Service Club Speaker: Why not talk with your local service club, or chamber of commerce about using YOU as a speaker?  This is a perfect opportunity to talk with a captive audience about the value of general aviation and general aviation airports.

Emergency Responder Appreciation Event: Each of our communities have unsung heroes. Our local emergency responders might love to come to the airport for an Appreciation Event.  Why not have a pancake breakfast, spaghetti feed, or burger fry and invite your local ambulance, search and rescue, law enforcement pilots, fire fighters and other emergency responders.  If you don’t feel like cooking, perhaps speak to your local Rotary, Lions Club, American Legion, Masons or Elks Club about cooking.

School Assemblies: Elementary schools have requirements about science education.  Aviation falls into that category.  Why not talk with your local principal about doing a fundamentals of flight assembly for your local school?  You could have RC models to illustrate lift, thrust, drag and gravity.  Perhaps you could show our promotional video “What is General Aviation?”  End your presentation with ways that the children can come to your airport. Remember children, bring their parents!

Young Eagle Pilot Joe Finnell

Young Eagle Pilot Joe Finnell

Becoming a living definition of General Aviation

In order to promote General Aviation, we need to define it for the non-flying public effectively.  It is very important to be positive and focus on the ways that G.A. helps our communities and our citizens.  When I meet someone at a Mooney Ambassador event I ask if they are a pilot, or know a pilot.  If not a pilot, I ask if they ever wanted to learn how to fly.  If yes, have they made steps toward learning, and if not, why not?   Even those folks who do not wish to become pilots would benefit from knowing how General Aviation affects them on a daily basis.

Do Something! “That’ll Never Happen Here” is something that I hear a lot.  Whether “that” is an airport closure, runway closure, or flight restriction, we need to be on guard for apathy in our pilot population.  What is the opposite of Apathy?  Passion! Mobilize volunteers, organize and overcome apathy.  Please make a commitment today to inspire the love of flight.

 

 

Community Events Make Airport Good Neighbor Pt.1

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

On Valentine’s Day I was happy to read that a federal judge dismissed the lawsuit brought about by the city of Santa Monica to take control of the airport with a goal of closing it and developing the land for other purposes. While this is happy news, it is also a temporary reprieve from the vocal minority of residents who oppose Santa Monica airport and who must be completely uneducated about its value in our national network of General Aviation airports.   As a psychotherapist for 25 years, I believe I have come to understand the psychology of life.  In my experience there are three kinds of people:
• Those who watch their life happen;
• Those who make their life happen;
• And those who wonder, “How does life happen?”

When it comes to General Aviation and the promotion of G.A. airports, we need to be firmly in the “make it happen” camp. Hopefully this blog will help inspire you to bring the fun back to your airport and illuminate to your community that airports indeed make good neighbors.

Positive aspect of promotion, inspiring the love of flight
Let’s bring the fun back to the airport. What are your earliest memories of aviation? Perhaps your Dad took you to the airport so you could watch airplanes take off and land. Remember your first flight? How can you make those memories for someone else?  Aviation is magical, yet we know the science behind the magic.  Inspiring the love of flight means going back to the magic and sharing it with others. You don’t have to focus solely on children. At our Mooney Ambassador events we meet adults who have always wanted to fly, and with encouragement, might take the first step.  Your enthusiasm is contagious.

Friends of Oceano Airport Toys for Tots

Friends of Oceano Airport, Toys for Tots

Community outreach a.k.a. fun ways we can get folks out to your airport:

•    Airport Day:  Does your local airport have a Celebration Day, Airport Day or Open House?  Have you thought about helping to volunteer versus just attending?  If there is no event, why not look into having a “Good Neighbor Day” or Airport Day?  Perhaps your airport used to have an event, but not now?  Have a small event to start with. AOPA publishes a wonderful guide to hosting an open house. In the photo below, we brought an inflatable kiddie swimming to a hot summer event, and our airplane display was the most popular by far!

•    Toys for Tots:  A lovely way to bring the community to your airport is to have a Toys for Tots event.  Contact your local T4T/Marine Corps representative and talk with them about the idea.  Folks can drive in, walk in or fly in bringing new unwrapped toys. Due to increased need for programs like Toys for Tots, toys and dollars donated helps local kids directly.
•    Fly-In Movie Night
Fly-in, walk-in, drive in, it doesn’t matter!  If you have a hangar, campground or open area you can host a Fly-In movie night, you can make a theater!  I suggest the event be free of charge.  Offer hot dogs, beverages, popcorn, and s’mores on a donation basis.  Show a family-friendly movie that has an aviation theme.

Make airport events fun

Make airport events fun!

Check back next month for the final installment.  Until then, be on the look out for an excuse to have an event at your airport. Remember everyone loves a good party.