Archive for the ‘Jolie Lucas’ Category

Humanity, Philanthropy, and GA

Saturday, December 21st, 2013
Photo Credit: Ross Mayfield

Stearman ready to inspire flight!

Ah humanity.  For those of us committed to growing the pilot population we often scratch our heads and wonder how we can reach the youth, the college-aged kids that might share the dream of aviation. This generation of twenty-somethings is deeply steeped in technology and many times and perhaps in some instances, rightly, gets labeled as a self-centered lot with little frustration tolerance or ability to delay gratification. On first blush, maybe not the best target audience for a future aviation mechanic or pilot.

Philanthropy is a word commonly understood from its root to mean the love of humanity, further defined as work that is meant to advance mankind and quality of life  though good works and deeds.  Years ago I was approached by a Lambda Chi Alpha member from our local university regarding our annual Friends of Oceano Airport Toys for Tots event.

Founded in the early 1900s, Lambda Chi Alpha was built on the following guiding principles:

  • Loyalty

    Connor Strong (left) and Chris Battaglia (right)

    Connor Strong (left) and Chris Battaglia (right)

  • Duty
  • Respect
  • Service & Stewardship
  • Integrity
  • Personal Courage

Look at these principles and you can’t help but be impressed. These are the same standards that serve us as aviators.   Year after year we have 15 to 30 Lambda Chi brothers who donate the first Friday and Saturday of December to Toys for Tots.  They come prepared to work, are eager, prompt, communicative, enthusiastic and engaged.  The Lambda Chi Alpha chapter at Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo California was established in 1979.  Since then the chapter has managed to win their most prestigious award, the Grand High Alpha,  a total of 5  times.

How brilliant is this?  A fraternity or sorority has requirements for philanthropic work during the year and an airport needs volunteers to help at events.  This is a match made in the heavens.  Add to the mix JR Smith and his 1943 Boeing Super Stearman. Based in Oceano, JR’s Banner Airways’ yellow bi-plane is a fixture up and down the coast on weekends.  It was JR’s idea to offer a highly discounted rate to each of the 30 Lambda Chis present on Saturday for an aerobatic ride.  Nearly all of them took him up on his generous offer.  College aged kids donate ten plus hours of service and then are treated to a taste of general aviation at one of the most picturesque airports in the country. But don’t take it from me, here are some of the testimonials.

Flying in that plane was hands down one of the craziest things I have ever done.  I am mad I have never volunteered at this event before because that was one of the most amazing experiences of my life.–Connor

This was my first time volunteering at the Toys for Tots event.  Travis would get up in our chapter meetings and talk about how much fun this event is every year so I was excited to get the chance to volunteer.  When we got there and I saw that JR was giving out plane rides I jumped at the opportunity.  The experience was awesome and if I had the chance to do it again, I absolutely would.  This was my first time volunteering at this event and, based off how much fun I had, I plan on doing it again next year.–Chad [the guy in the video!]

The only time I have ever been to a small airport like that was when our fraternity volunteered at previous Toys for Tots events and I have never been flown in a small plane like that before.  In fact, I have only flown in an airplane three times in my life.  Initially, I had no intention to fly in the plane with JR, but after every single person that flew raved about how awesome it was, I could not resist.  I could not be more happy with my decision to fly with JR, as it was an experience that I will never forget.  Regarding the Toys for Tots event itself, we volunteer at the event every year and always have a great time.  This is an event that Lambda Chi Alpha plans on volunteering for for many years to come.–Travis

The brothers of Lambda Chi Alpha with Jolie and Mooney Lucas

In short, don’t forget the young philanthropists that might be in your hometown.  Bring them to your airport. Educate them about its value to the community. Get them in an airplane.  Stand back and watch them squeal with childlike delight and end with “That was awesome!” Click to see Lambda Chis Fly High

‘Tis the Season of Thanksgiving and Goodwill

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Around this time of year my counseling practice gets as busy as KOSH in July!  The pressures of holiday time, changes in weather, and family commitments makes a lot of folks want a little “dual” on the couch.  One of the things I remind my clients of is the fact that even at our worst times, we have something to be grateful for.  As we are on approach for 2014, I am reminded of the things I am thankful for in the past year.

Our aviation family is really quite small and well connected. This allows us to bicker like siblings but in the end stick together toward a common goal.  Whether you are from a red state or a blue state we understand that we need everyone in our family, including our crazy uncle.

I love doing charitable work at airports.  The impact is three-fold. First it helps the worthy charity.  Secondly it illuminates the value of airports to their communities.  And lastly it makes me feel good.  Whenever I am having a personal pity party I think about how I can be of service to others. Service gets me out of my stresses and helps alleviate stress for another.  While it might be too late this year to start a holiday event at an airport, do some thinking about next year, and while you are at it, attend an event like a toy drive, Toys for Tots, Toys for Kids now.

Three hours driving beats twelve in the car!

Three hours flying the Mooney beats twelve in the car!

 

I am appreciative that I have my major source of long-trip travel be an airplane.  Flying my vintage Mooney allows me to save time, do more things, and enjoy the flying.  Last month I flew for an hour and a half to Northern California, completed some business, then flew back to my home ‘drome. Had the trip been in a car it would have taken twelve hours.

 

I am always in awe of little airports that put on display days, airport days or fly-ins.  We attended one last month in Central California’s Minter Field.  Here is how they welcomed their flying and community visitors:  Free pancake breakfast for all guests flying in; free presentation by a WASP and a gal who was a “Rosie the Riveter”; free spot landing and flour bombing contest with cash prizes [I was the bombardier in a 1943 Super Stearman and got 3rd place]. They had lots of aircraft on display, a food vendor or two and I almost forgot, free popsicles!  The event was well attended by the public from the surrounding communities.  Being an event administrator myself I would estimate the day cost $750, maybe $1000.  But think about it?  How much ad space can you get for $750?  TV Spot? Not much. Goodwill in the community? Priceless.

Bombardier and Pilot

Jolie Lucas, Bombardier and JR Smith, Pilot

 

I am grateful that we have big airshows to go to such as Sun n Fun, EAA Oshkosh, AOPA Summit.  These large shows give a lot of exposure to the communities in which they are held as well as provide an excellent source of education, gadgetry, and social connection.

 

So as we ready ourselves for 2014 we should be mindful that unless we all work together the tapestry of our general aviation family could fade.  Think of how you can contribute to its vibrancy.  Get involved, use your voice, get in the air and have some fun.

 

 

Fly it Forward! The Williamson Flying Club inspires the love of flight & educates their business community.

Friday, October 25th, 2013

It is not every day that we hear about dedicated volunteers who think outside the box to inspire the love of aviation and to educate members of the business community. However that is just what the Williamson Flying Club has done in western New York. I dare you not to be inspired after reading about this engaged group of volunteers at KSDC Williamson-Sodus airport. Take their lead and find ways at your local ‘drome to get into the spotlight.

The Williamson Flying Club

Founded in nearly sixty years ago by five local pilots, the Williamson Flying Club [WFC] purchased land in the nearby town of Sodus to establish an airport in 1957.  Beginning as a small grass strip, the airport now is the 7th largest General Aviation airport in New York State, with approximately 70 based aircraft, 50 hangars, a 3800′ runway with GPS RNAV approaches, AWOS and a fuel farm. Managed by the Board of Directors of the Williamson Flying Club, the airport is a public-use reliever airport and is the only hard-surfaced runway in the county.  It boasts over 25,000 operations per year.  On field business include the club-managed FBO, and two maintenance facilities.  According to New York State economic development reports, the airport contributes $2.3 Million to the local economy and $115,000 in school, property and state and local taxes.  All of this comes at no cost to the local towns, county or county taxpayers.

In 2013 the Williamson Flying Club created the Williamson Flying Club Aviation & Aviation Sciences Scholarship awarded to a graduating high school student who chooses post-secondary study in an aviation-related field at a college, university or trade school.  The scholarship is $1,000, payable in $250 amounts each year over four years, or $500 each year for two-year programs.

Williamson Flying Club

Pictured, left to right, Jake DeGroote (Founding Member), Stephen Murray (Secretary), Sheila Sperr, John Sperr, Paul Sperr (Scholarship Winner), Joe Ebert (President) and Bob Herloski (Treasurer).

Scholarship winner Paul Sperr received a certificate and will be receiving $1000 over the course of his four years of study at the University of Buffalo. Paul is a 2013 graduate of the Williamson High School.

Paul was valedictorian and he will be majoring in Aerospace Engineering.  In addition to the scholarship funds, Paul also received a membership in the Williamson Flying Club, and they have invited him to use his membership to learn more about aviation, meet pilots and mechanics and maybe some day, start taking flying lessons.

 

 

The WFC shows the value of an airport to the business community

Photo Credit: Joe Ebert

Attendees received a promotional bag, pen and wine with custom label.

Williamson-Sodus Airport [KSDC] was invited by the Wayne County, New York, Economic Development/Industrial Development Agency to present an overview of the airport’s economic impact to the region to a group of about sixty decision-makers which included local town and government leaders, state and federal representatives, county tourism, planning and economic development officials.  Local business leaders,bankers and real estate developers also attended.

The day-long event began at the airport, with County Supervisor Jim Hoffman welcoming the attendees.  The airport presentation followed, which discussed the size, scope and capabilities of the airport, the airport land that is available for compatible non-aviation development, as well as the obligations the airport has to remain an airport “in perpetuity”, due to grant assurance obligations.  As club President Joe Ebert remarked, “from an economic development standpoint, it’s important that potential investors who make decisions based on the presence of an airport have confidence that the airport will be there in 5, 10, 20 or 30 years or more!”

Each attendee boarded the bus that took the group on a tour of the region to learn more about the region’s economy and opportunities for economic development.  Attendees were given a canvas airport logo’d bag to carry all the items they would gather that day, a copy of the presentation and a nifty airport logo’d pen.

Custom wine labels featuring airport

Custom wine labels featuring airport. Photo Credits: Joe Ebert

When the group returned to the airport, having just completed a wine tasting at Young Sommer winery just a few miles down the road,  each participant was surprised with a split of an award-winning fruit-blended wine from the winery, custom labeled for the airport.

The “Fab Five” who created the Williamson-Sodus airport had vision, passion and perseverance.  It seems to me that nearly sixty years since its inception, the flame has not flickered.  The scholarship entices the youth, the wine might entice the long in the tooth, but the educational and economic value to the community is boundless.  Airports such as KSDC prove that they are good neighbors and an asset to the surrounding communities.

Now it is time for you to think out of the box.  As I am fond of saying, there are three kinds of people: those who watch their lives happen, those who make their lives happen, and those who wonder how life happens.  The Williamson Flying Club made it happen.  You can too.

 

The Man in the Arena

Friday, September 27th, 2013

Fight to keep your airport an airportIt is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

THE MAN IN THE ARENA, Theodore Roosevelt Excerpt from the speech “Citizenship In a Republic, April, 1910

I have been spending the week thinking about how best to remain engaged in the struggle to keep airports, airports.  How do we have the courage face the critic with the bullhorn, who points out every single misstep?  How do we steel ourselves against the inevitable bully who says, “You can’t do that”? How do we have the resolution to stay motivated and involved in the fight?

After watching psychological researcher Brene Brown’s recent lecture on daring greatly [http://www.oprah.com/oprahs-lifeclass/Oprah-and-Dr-Brene-Brown-on-Vulnerability-and-Daring-Greatly-Video], I found myself reading and re-reading the above quote by Theodore Roosevelt.  While arguably the longest sentence I have ever read, the heart of this speech is to try and keep trying.  In the face of the critic, the one who points out your shortcomings, who blasts you with disbelief, remain standing.

Those of us who work in airport and aviation advocacy know that we cannot give up and we know we will fall.  But as Roosevelt points out the man “who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who a the worst if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly”.

If daring greatly were a charge, how would you respond?  Think about your home airport.   If you dared greatly what would you do there?  How would you engage a community that is not sure of the airport’s worth?  How would you push forward safety enhancements?  If you weren’t afraid, what would you do? Think about yourself as an aviation lover.  How can you share that passion with another?  How can you give of yourself toward a greater good?

I have always taught my children that if you are going down, you should go down swinging.  Flight instructors say that to fly that airplane all the way down to the ground.  The take away here is Engagement. Action. Perseverance.  Roosevelt was talking about being an active citizen.  What if we applied active citizenry to aviation?  Would we be dusty, tired and bloody souls daring greatly?  Or are we the cold, timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. I choose the former.  Want to come with me?

 

Teach them to dare greatly!

Teach them to dare greatly!

Gold in the gold country; an example of Fly it Forward!

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Nestled in the foothills of the California’s Sierra Mountains is Columbia Airport O22. Boasting a beautifully manicured grass strip, fly-in campground, and an asphalt strip, Columbia is a picturesque fly-in destination in California. Columbia is an old gold mining town and is actually a state park. The town is within walking distance from the airport. Annually the airport hosts the Father’s Day Fly-In, I believe next year is the 47th annual. This popular weekend event has activities and accommodations for all ages. From the flour bombing and spot-landing contest to the tours of the air attack fire base, aircraft displays and an air show, a good time is had by all.

As those of us who put on airport events know, these events do not just magically happen. As Jim Thomas the airport manager of Columbia is keenly aware there is more gold in Columbia than what tourists in town are panning for. The true gold is the team of volunteers who assemble starting on Tuesday or Wednesday to make the Father’s Day Fly-In a safe, enjoyable and memorable experience for the thousands who attend. My husband Mitch and I have been volunteers at Columbia for the past five years. As with the other volunteers, we donate our time, fuel to get there. I commend Jim and his team for helping the volunteers to feel valued and respected. The volunteer experience starts with a warm greeting followed by a detailed meeting and distribution of our colorful volunteer t-shirts. We are able to sign up for duties that match our skill set. During our time as volunteers we receive snacks, water, pop and lunch at no cost. The free t-shirt and meals are a way that the airport manager helps the volunteers to feel noticed, nurtured and appreciated. At the end of the weekend we are all dog-tired. But it is a happy tired. Jim and I both know volunteers are the extended family of airports and aviation events.

Recently I was at an airport on the coast of California whose tower was threatened in the sequestration. After landing and heading to the airport restaurant I saw a sign that said ‘Help us save our control tower. Please get busy doing touch and goes.”

I thought this was a novel way to get attention to their plight. Since the California Pilots Association annual convention California Dreamin’ is coming up on October 18-19 and the mission of CalPilots is to save airports and inspire the love of flight, I decided to go to the flight school next to the restaurant to ask them to post a notice. I headed to the FBO and was met by a young girl at the counter. I introduced myself as the vice-president of Cal Pilots and asked if we could put up a post card to advertise our free aviation event. “I am sorry it is against our policy to post things.” I asked to speak with the manager, “I am sorry they are too busy to talk to you.” Then in exasperation I asked where I could post a notice. “I don’t know” was her response. I just shook my head and left.

You might ask what this has to do with volunteers. The short answer is that we all must band together to protect our airports, and inspire the love of flight. We can do that by helping each other with advocacy and promotion of events at our airports. Our fun events, like California Dreamin’ at San Luis Obispo airport, make them a good neighbor. When we bring the community to our events, such as the balloon glow or wine tasting, or burger fry and dance then we have won two battles. First we have invited everyone from our community we demystify the airport and make it an approachable place. Secondly we spark the ember of flight and of being a pilot.

The old saying is: if we aren’t part of the solution, we are part of the problem. Let’s all be part of the solution. Check out your “policies” and make sure that they are friendly and inclusive. We don’t need anyone thinking that aviation is an all male rich person’s club. Recognize the folks who volunteer at airports not for any monetary gain, but for the love of aviation, thank them for truly being golden.

‘What is going on with Georgia? And why do we need to save it?’

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

My husband and I are just back from 10 days at Oshkosh for AirVenture 2013. On Sunday the last day, I finally had time to go through the Innovations pavilion.  Located inside were many displays about new frontiers in technology, space travel, and big dreamers.

I sat down with a fellow in the Aerojet Rocketdyne booth.  As we handed out brightly colored Frisbees to last-day attendees he said, “I have been meaning to ask someone, I see all these buttons and shirts. What is going on with Georgia, and why do we need to save it?”  Georgia?  I thought for a minute. Georgia.  Oh, I get it, GA.  I quickly explained that we as an aviation community are trying to promote general aviation and protect airports. I let him know that on the back of the first Mooney Ambassador sweatshirts we had a slogan “What have you done for G.A. lately?”  Once in a restaurant a lady came up to me and said what is GA. [as in goo goo gaa gaa].  “Oh”, he said, “they don’t let us use acronyms when we do community presentations.  They want us to use the full names of things so folks in the community know what we are talking about.” I think our rocket scientist friend has a point here.

We all need to make a commitment to speaking in plain English about what general aviation is.  In the past, we talked about what it is not i.e.: military and airlines.  Nevertheless, what it is not does not give us a clear picture of what it is.  I suppose depending on my audience; I talk about general aviation in different ways.  As a mother I talk with folks about medical flying, whether it is search and rescue, air ambulance, blood and tissue donations, or flying doctors.  If it were my child that needed a crucial service, would l prefer waiting on ground-based transport or the immediacy and ease of general aviation?  Most agree that airport or aircraft noise is welcome when you think it might be saving someone’s life.  As a psychotherapist, I talk to folks about the magic of being a pilot and the ability to travel in all three dimensions. As a business owner, I talk about having three offices in three states.  General aviation is the way that I can make my businesses more profitable.  As a pilot, I talk with other pilots about the danger of apathy, especially concerning general aviation and our airports.  As Jimmy Buffet said: “Ignorance or apathy? I don’t know and I just don’t care.”  We need to be on guard against apathy in our pilot population.  If you think that one voice does not matter just go back to our friend from Aerojet Rocketdyne thinking Georgia was in danger.  It just took one voice to enlighten him.