Aviators All

February 7th, 2014 by Jack Olcott

Juliet said to Romeo, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Perhaps those who embrace the vast arena of aviation should follow the advice that William Shakespeare ascribed to the heroine of his tragic tale of two lovers from warring clans. What things are matters, not what we call them.

The aviation community spends far too much effort labeling the various segments of flight: Business Aviation, Military Aviation, Airline Aviation, Private Aviation, Recreational Aviation, Whatever Aviation. All such words relate to the pursuit of flight, regardless of what name we give to the endeavor.

Richard L. Collins, possibly the world’s the most prolific aviation journalist, questioned whether the community focused too heavily on Business Aviation. He encouraged his multitude of readers to grasp the many dimensions of flight and embrace aviation’s benefits. Being an aviator opened a new world of inspiring sights and significant personal accomplishment. Aviation provided unique emotional pleasure as well as effective transportation. He seemed to be saying that flying was worthwhile simply because it was flying.

I believe that Collin’s perception that love of flight is the basis for being a pilot is valid. Very few, if any, individuals become professional pilots because their parents forced them into some form of Business or Airline Aviation. Becoming a military aviator requires more than a decade of training and typically results in the individual remaining in the service for 20 or more years. Who would embark on such a path other than those who found flying fulfilling? A career as an airline pilot requires a similar long-term commitment, often marked by many years of relatively low pay and challenging working conditions as the cost of obtaining seniority. Experienced aviators who fly for a living say that an early passion for flight motivated them to build time and strive for stature within aviation.

Obviously the high cost of aviation drives the focus on Business Aviation. Gaining experience without being engaged in some form of commercial aviation is far too expensive for even the affluent to purchase. Thus the would-be professional aviator often turns to flight instruction or possibly utility aviation, perhaps followed by charter flying—all aspects of flight that fall within the general category of business. If truly fortunate, the aspiring professional might find employment with a corporate flight department with a mentoring program, although most corporations demand considerable experience before adding personnel to their flight staff.

For many aviators, however, Business Aviation is a means to an end, not the sole reason for engaging in flight. Consider the pilots you know. In our area, at least three highly successful physicians fly aircraft typically identified with Business Aviation—two each operate Beechcraft King Air C90s and one flies a Cessna CJ 1. The Citation operator covers his responsibilities at a network of clinics, flying single-pilot. One of the King Air operators retired from his medical practice and captains his Beechcraft in charter services. The other King Air pilot flies for personal business and holds an ATP certificate. Each of these highly accomplished professionals embraced what we think of a Business Aviation while engaged in non-aviation careers.

The challenge and joy of aviation link all aviators, regardless of what we name their activities. Also, gravity does not differentiate among those who venture aloft. All who fly are aviators. Let all who fly join each other in advocating the benefits of aviation as an enabling technology for economic development and enhanced quality of life.

Jack Olcott

Jack Olcott is president of General Aero Co. and past president of the National Business Aviation Association. Olcott has a rich history in aviation, including working as a flight instructor and flight research specialist, leading aviation media properties for McGraw-Hill, and serving on various advisory boards and councils. His current activities involve advocating the advantages of business aviation domestically as well as internationally. Olcott has more than 8,500 hours of flight time and type ratings in a Learjet, Citation I and II, Dassault Falcon 50/900, and Beech Model 300/1900.

The opinions expressed by the bloggers do not reflect AOPA’s position on any topic.

  • Michael

    Just a point of accuracy: Military Aviation does not take a decade of training. At the most, were you to include the 4 or 5 years of college you could say it takes 8, but from Start to finish Aviation Training for the military is about 1.5-2.5 years of training. Not including any of the time it takes to move around the country or spent waiting to start a given phase a training.

    That being said, we are all students from our first flight to our last. A flight where you don’t learn was a wasted line in the log book.

    Source: I’m a military flight student about 2 days from finishing and being designated a Naval Aviator.

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