Posts Tagged ‘taildragger’

Never too old to fly

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Ted Brother’s Success Story is just a little bit different than our usual wonderful solo and checkride photos that turn up on our Facebook wall. For one thing, Ted is in his 70s. For another, he started out learning to fly in a taildragger. Here’s Ted’s story in its entirety.—Ed.

“I’ve taught 10- and 12-year-olds to fly, so yes, I can teach you.”

With these words Paul Santopietro started my odyssey on Aug. 14, 2012, when he took me on as a student at Katama Airfield (1B2) at Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. I was not 10 or 12; I was 76 years and two months old when I started my dream—to learn to fly.

Katama is a National Heritage grass field, and Paul’s 1975 Model 7KCAB Citabria N8680V was the airplane. The eight to 10 hours normally reserved to learn how to taxi and maneuver a taildragger on the ground soon turned into 12 to 15 hours. Learning to get my septuagenarian body into and out of this tandem two-seater proved to be equally as challenging.

My introduction to flying lasted until the end of September when Nancy and I headed to Naples, Fla., for the winter. With 18 hours of dual under my belt

student pilot solos Cessna 172 at age 77

Ted Brother (left) with CFI Skip Bentley after soloing the Cessna 172 in Fort Myers.

I joined the Fort Myers Flying Club at Page Field (KFMY) as a student pilot and transitioned to a Cessna 172S. Skip Bentley now had the oldest student he ever taught, and the flying club had its oldest student member ever.On May 15, 2013, just 23 days before celebrating my seventy-seventh birthday, I soloed N3512Q at La Belle Municipal (X14) in La
Belle, Fla. After eight months of Class D airspace, with tower, ATIS ,
ground, and jet traffic to contend with, I looked forward to my return to the
grass at Katama and the stick and rudder of Paul’s taildragger.

On July 31, 2013, I soloed N8080V and received my tailwheel endorsement.

Student pilot solos Citabria at age 77.

Brother soloed this Citabria in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. He’s shown with CFI Paul Santopietro.

In November 2013 I passed the FAA knowledge exam. After six days of patient instruction by David Abramson at Pompano Airpark in Pompano Beach Florida (KPMP), and just 70 days before my seventy-eighth birthday, he scheduled my checkride.The oral went well, but the check ride was discontinued because of weather. After two agonizing weeks of waiting I returned to KPMP, passed the checkride, and received my certificate, 57 days before my seventy-eighth birthday. As I approach my seventy-ninth year having fulfilled a lifelong dream, I am thankful for my wife Nancy’s support, for the great instructors I have had, and for the wonderful new and interesting acquaintances and friends I have made through this flying experience. I have no dream of getting my ATP; I just want to fly in clear skies and have the opportunity to buy a few $100 hamburgers—well, maybe an SES endorsement might be next.—Ted Brother

Are you interested in learning to fly? As Ted knows, it’s never too late to start! Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resources for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Photo of the Day: Stearman with stripes

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

Stearman 450There’s something about a Stearman, and when you add in a snappy paint scheme like this one has, you’ve got a real winner. This Stearman was photographed over Lake Geneva in 2007. If you had been able to attend any of the 23 annual National Biplane Association fly-ins, you would’ve been able to see many beautiful examples of these fine aircraft. Sadly, the expo held its last event in 2009. Editor Mike Collins wrote about it, and you can read the article online.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Maule M-4

Monday, December 10th, 2012

There are taildraggers, and then there’s the Maule. The Maule family has been building sturdy tailwheel airplanes known for their short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability from the factory in Moultree, Georgia, since the 1950s. This one provides side-by-side seating, somewhat unusual for a taildragger but a definite selling point. Alton Marsh, who’s flown more than a few Maules in his career, describes the characteristics of the Maule M-4 shown here in the article, “Back to the Future,” which originally appeared in the March 2005 AOPA Pilot magazine. (  http://www.aopa.org/pilot/features/2005/feat0503.html ) —-Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Huskys in formation

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

It’s supposed to be a big secret–or maybe not–but formation flying for photo shoots is one of the coolest things an AOPA editor does. Here, AOPA’s Mike Fizer captures Dwayne Clemens and former AOPA Pilot editor Nate Ferguson in a yellow Husky 200-hp A-1B leading another Husky A-1B with tundra tires flown by Greg Largen and Alex Clemens.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: The happy Champ

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

A friend of mine once owned an Aeronca Champ, which she affectionately called “The Happy Champ.” I’m not sure whether it earned its nickname because of its appearance or because of the emotions it inspired in her and others. In any event, the Champ is a popular member of the tailwheel family. While it doesn’t have the legion of fans that Piper Cubs boast, pilots new to tailwheel training enjoy the Champ because it’s a little more forgiving and it doesn’t sit up quite so high, making its forward view a bit better.–Jill W. Tallman