Posts Tagged ‘Piper Cherokee’

Take me flying

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Sammy in Miss JDogs that enjoy riding in cars generally enjoy flying in airplanes. That’s the conventional wisdom, and it holds up for the most part (although dogs that ride in cars without an issue can become airsick, so many pilots don’t feed dogs before taking them up).

My dog Sammy enjoyed riding in cars. She would sit up in the back and look out (or stick her nose out the open window, weather permitting) with a serenity that our other dogs lacked. No crying or barking, no bouncing back and forth between windows. She would simply take in all that there was to see.

I wanted to take her flying, so I finally did. She was 13 years old and 56 pounds, so it wasn’t easy to load her into the back of my Cherokee. She didn’t understand that she was to head into the open door, and she tried to walk out onto the right wing. Once in the backseat, however, she realized that she had simply been helped into another kind of vehicle, and she sat up just as she had always done in our cars, ready to take in the view. She didn’t lie down or move around; she simply gazed out the rear window and watched the Earth below, much as she’d watched cars and people and landscapes while traveling on the ground.

When we were finished with our flight, I went to the nearest drive-through and bought her a $100 hamburger.

That was our one flight. For me, it was enough. For Sammy, who knows? Dogs just like to be with their people, and while she enjoyed her hamburger, she probably wouldn’t have cared whether we went for a walk, or a drive, or a flight. Still, I’m glad I took her flying. This picture is from November 2012, before arthritis and the tumor that eventually took their toll.

Take your dog flying. You’ll both have a great time.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Ercoupe

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

 

Often imitated, never duplicated, the Ercoupe is one of the nation’s quirkiest and best-loved GA aircraft. A  brief history: It was born in 1939 (its designer, Fred Weick, later worked on the Piper Cherokee line). Weick gave it tricycle landing gear and trailing-link main gear to help make challenging landings tamer, and he limited elevator up-travel to help reduce the potential for a stall. Oh, and he did away with rudder pedals, and interconnected the ailerons to the rudders–so you steer it like a car. You can fly it with the canopy open, and AOPA Pilot Editor at Large Tom Horne swears that you can stick your arm out the window and turn the airplane that way. He wrote about it in the March 2012 issue ( http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2012/march/f_ercoupe.html?WT.mc_id=&wtmcid;&WT.mc_sect=gan ).—Jill W. Tallman

How we get the shots: May 2012 cover

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Call us wimps, but your Flight Training editors weren’t willing to put a perfectly good airplane down in a field so as to provide that extra level of realism needed to illustrate “You Were Ready for This,” which appears on p. 24 of the May 2012 issue.

But we–that is, I was willing to allow my 1964 Piper Cherokee to be towed into the grass beside Taxiway H at Frederick Municipal Airport. Then, photographer Chris Rose took to the skies in a helicopter (supplied by Advanced Helicopter Concepts) to get shots of my airplane from overhead.

Chris Anderberg, who works in our accounting and finance department, portrayed a pilot who has successfully executed an off-airport landing and is checking out the possible “damages.” (We often grab unsuspecting colleagues out of their cubicles and offices to play bemused, scared, excited, or frustrated pilots. They usually deliver the goods.)

With base shots in place, Rose used Photoshop to remove the surrounding airport environment (which includes a row of hangars, runways, taxiways, and a brand-new air traffic control tower) and put in some furrows.

Now that you know, how do you think he did? –Jill W. Tallman

This student pilot is a “Shining Star”

Monday, March 12th, 2012

I collected my registration materials at the Women in Aviation International conference in Dallas last week and slung my name tag on its lanyard around my neck. Heading back to the elevator, I boarded a car with three other gentlemen.

One of the men noticed my name tag and asked, “Are you with Women of Aviation?” I am. “Are you a pilot?” Yes. “How long have you been flying?” Eleven years, I said, and I fly a Piper Cherokee.

The man’s face lit up. “I’m a student pilot,” he said. “I’ve been at it awhile.” He said something about his music career keeps him busy. When I asked if he had ever read Flight Training, he looked quizzical, so I offered to send him a copy of the magazine. Did he have a business card? He didn’t. Did I have a business card? Yes, I did. I started fumbling in my purse for one while he held the elevator door at my stop.

As I handed him my card, he said, “Maybe you’ve heard of our group. Earth, Wind, and Fire.”

That’s when I said something like “OhmygoshIloveyourmusicsendmeyouremailandI’llsendyouamagazine!” And the elevator doors closed.

I went online and found out that I had been talking to Verdine White, who, with his brother, Maurice, founded the group about 40 years ago. I wish we’d had more time to talk about flying, and I kind of think Verdine felt that way too. — Jill W. Tallman

The Places You’ll Go: An ice runway in New Hampshire

Friday, February 24th, 2012

“The Places You’ll Go” is an occasional series of blog posts from Flight Training readers about the adventures they experience with a new pilot certificate. We hope these posts will inspire you to press on to the finish line of your own certificate. If you would like to submit a post, email Jill Tallman.—Ed.

On final to Alton Bay, New Hampshire

When we first get the itch to become an aviator, there could be a number of reasons why. Some folks become pilots to make a living flying. Some just for fun. Then there are the ones who do it to test their skills, explore, and enjoy the many destinations that are out there.

Recently my flying partner and best friend Frank Grossman and I fulfilled one of our “bucket list” flying destinations…Alton Bay, New Hampshire. B18 is located at the southern tip of Lake Winnipesaukee and is the only registered ice landing airport in the continental United States. (Ed. note: It’s a seaplane base in the summer.) For a very short period in January and February, the lake freezes over enough to allow general aviation aircraft to land. Frank owns a beautiful 1965 Cherokee 260 Six, which we take all over the place when the opportunity arises.

The day of our trip starting out at Greater Rochester International Airport, we were blessed with clear skies and a nice tailwind to boot. Thirty miles from the bay we encountered clouds and winds, which only got more intense as we got closer. The approach from the south using Runway 1 requires you to make a short-field landing over the hill and trees with swirling winds for us that day were 23 gusting to 31 straight down our nose. The runway was marked by cones since there was not a hint of snow, making it slick glare ice, so braking was pretty much nil! The outside air temp was around 20 degrees but the winds were strong, giving us concern for the Six to get pushed around; chocks were useless unless they had nails driven into the bottoms.

After enjoying a tasty burger and fries while meeting some of the friendly locals, we received our certificate for skillfully landing on the ice. Frank and I loaded up the Six, pointed back into the 30-knot headwind, and were airborne in about 500 feet. The local folks had asked if we could do a return for approach from the north so they could get some photos. Of course we could, it was our pleasure. The winds are very tricky in that end of the lake, which cuased a couple moments of “let’s think this through” before we proceeded. Once clear of the lake, we pointed the nose skyward for the journey back home to KROC, still enjoying some gusty winds. We reached our cruise altitude of 8,500 feet and began to enjoy some much calmer air that only got smoother as the sun started to settle.

Some folks might ask why someone would even consider taking a flight like this knowing that you could run into unfavorable conditions and not be able to get to your primary destination. We as pilots train, train, and train some more so that we have all of the variables in place regarding each and every situation. Safety is first and foremost; it is the number one item at the top of the list with no substitutes. We plan, lay out our options, and go if everything looks right–no second guesses. So why did Frank and I make this trip to such a beautiful destination? To enjoy the rewards of experiencing just such a flight that tested our skills, to explore a place that we had only heard of, and to be able to pass on to others…because we are pilots. Now if you will excuse me, I need to finish up planning our next trip. Blue skies, tailwinds, and most of all, let’s be safe out there. —Pat Collins