Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Time to get serious

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Adam Brement soloed April 18 in a bright-red Cherokee 140 at Griffiss International Airport (KRME) in Rome, N.Y. Here’s his story.—Ed.

Adam Brement (right) with his grandfather, Luigi Bottini.

Adam Brement (right) with his grandfather, Luigi Bottini.

I have been flying my entire life. I grew up around aviation, all thanks to my grandfather, Luigi Bottini. Luigi is a Master CFII. He owned and operated a flight school called Galaxy Aviation. I officially started logging hours back in 1992 but never had the consistency to apply the knowledge and hours to solo. Back then dating my high school sweetheart had taken priority over flying.

But over the years after high school and college I married my high school sweetheart, started a family, and am now the proud owner of Galaxy Aviation Flight School & Pilots Club. Since taking over the reins of the flight school, I figured I should get serious about getting my license.

Adam on solo day, in Rome, N.Y.

Adam on solo day, in Rome, N.Y.

On April 18, 2014, I finally got the opportunity to solo! What a surreal feeling. After all these years of flying with my grandfather (best friend) by my side, I was now about to be all by my lonesome. It was awesome. I took what seemed like an eternity to do my preflight check/runup, double checking everything, I didn’t want to miss a thing. The tower cleared me for takeoff, and down Runway 15 I went.

Takeoff went beautiful. I climbed to 1,500 feet, made left traffic, and proceeded to fly the pattern. As I came around for my landing I had everything lined up and it was smooth. I did it!

I talked to myself out loud through the whole thing making sure not to forget anything. My grandfather is 80 yrs old, and is my best bud. We fly every chance we get. I spent my summer vacations from the age of 12 till I was 18 flying cross-country to Oshkosh, Wis. I know my grandfather couldn’t be more proud of my accomplishment.

On top of running the flight school, I am the director of maintenance for Saint John The Baptist Roman Catholic Church in Rome, N.Y. I am in charge of the maintenance for the buildings and grounds of two churches in our parish. In the winter I am a level 1 hockey coach, and I coach my son’s hockey team. My wife and I also run the Cub Scout/Boy Scout program in the city of Rome. I have two kids, son Kyle, 7, and daughter Emily, 10. I hope to someday pass this experience on to my kids.—Adam Brement

Are you interested in learning to fly? Would you like to experience the thrill of flying an airplane by yourself, like Adam did? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resources for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Time flies when you’re landing an Airbus on the Hudson

Friday, January 10th, 2014

Hard to believe that January 15, 2014, marks the five-year anniverary of the day that will always be known as “Miracle on the Hudson.”

As most of us recall, US Airways Flight 1549, piloted by Capt. Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger and First Officer Jeffrey Skiles, landed in the Hudson River in New York after striking a flock of Canada geese. Both engines failed on climbout from LaGuardia Airport in New York City en route to Charlotte, North Carolina. Sullenberger decided they didn’t have enough altitude to turn back or make an emergency landing at Teterboro, New Jersey. He told New York Tracon, “We’re gonna be in the Hudson,” and that was the last transmission from the airplane before it touched down in the river.

Just writing that last sentence gave me goosebumps.

Thankfully, all turned out well. All passengers and crew were evacuated safely.

Now retired from US Airways, Sullenberg remains an active and vocal figure in the aviation industry. Jeppesen created an approach plate commemorating the “Miracle” landing.

Skiles took a leave of absence from the airline and is working for the Experimental Aircraft Association. He eventually got a seaplane rating, too [insert your own joke here].

One of the passengers on that fateful flight went on to earn a private pilot certificate. I interviewed Clay Presley shortly after his solo for this Flight Training magazine article, and you can hear him tell the story of the Miracle on the Hudson from the point of view of someone who was sitting in the cabin section on this AOPA Live video.  —Jill W. Tallman

This entry was edited to correct the date to Jan. 15—Ed.

A flight lesson and a wedding

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

 

Scott Brosnan (left) wed Shelly Williams last week at a ceremony officiated by Scott's CFI, Jeff Vandeyacht (right).

Scott Brosnan (left) wed Shelly Williams last week at a ceremony officiated by Scott’s CFI, Jeff Vandeyacht (right).

When I interviewed Jeff Vandeyacht about the challenges of taking over a flight school and making it a sustainable business for the March 2011 Flight Training, I had no idea he was so multitalented. Jeff owns True Course Flight School in Fulton, N.Y.

I’ve gotten to know Jeff a little bit thanks to Facebook, and I can tell you that he’s a CFI (obviously),  an entrepreneur, and a dog owner. Now add “ordained minister” to the list. Last week he performed a wedding for one of his students—with a ceremony that started off as a flight lesson.

I’ll let Jeff tell it:

“Scott Brosnan is my student (Private) and we’ve been flying together for about a year. He’s a welder for National Grid. He welds on gas pipe lines with gas in them! Yikes!

“His fiancée (now wife) is Shelly Williams. … She has been along with me and Scott a couple of times and enjoyed the flights.

“You get to know each other pretty well during the hours you spend together in the plane and Scott and I established a good rapport right from the beginning. He told me of his fiancée Shelly and how they just didn’t have any hard plans on the when and where of their wedding. They wanted to [tie the knot] but they had been together so long it wasn’t so much of a priority.

Jeff mentioned “in an offhanded way” that he happened to be an ordained minister, and suggested as a joke that they perform the ceremony in the air. “It wasn’t long after that he told me that he mentioned it to Shelly and that she was all in if there was a way to make it happen.

“We kicked it around and determined that doing it during a flight in a Skyhawk was impractical so we figured it would be fun to pick a scenic airport, fly in, do the deed, and head back. It was a little cloudy but bright and other wise a great day. Scott was clearly a little nervous so the landing wasn’t great (lol).  The ‘ceremony’ lasted only minutes and I pronounced them husband and wife. Good times.”

Congratulations to Shelly and Scott on this new chapter in their lives; continued success to Scott on his flight training journey. Oh–how did Jeff manage to become an ordained minister in the first place? About eight years ago, friends asked if he would officiate at their ceremony, and he went online and got ordained in the Universal Life Church, a nondenomination organization that has been in existence since the 1950s. He’s performed a few weddings at no charge in the intervening years, “Just for friends and family who ask and now, I guess, for flight students.” He joked that he’s thinking of changing True Course Flight School’s slogan to “Expertise—Experience—Patience—Weddings.”—Jill W. Tallman

A brief explanation of the Whitlow Letter

Monday, February 4th, 2013

It is common practice to want to pick on the FAA, and often with good reason. However, there are times when the feds do something that is most definitely for the greater good. Most pilots, for example, are aware that in the wake of the Colgan crash in Buffalo, N.Y., the FAA has created new rest rules designed to make it easier for pilots to be adequately rested during their trips. This is a win-win for the companies (though, to hear them tell it, they will all go bankrupt), the pilots, and the traveling public.

But the real breakthrough for this came around 2000, when the FAA issued what is commonly called the “Whitlow Letter.” At that time, the standard practice at the airlines with regard to reserve pilots was to work under the assumption that if a pilot was on reserve, he was not technically on duty until he actually reported for an assignment. This meant that if a pilot woke up at 7 a.m. and went on reserve at noon for a reserve window of availability of 14 hours (which was, and still is, common practice), the company could call him up at the tail end of his window—2 a.m. in this case—and keep him on duty and flying until 4 p.m. the following afternoon. This pilot faced the possibility of being awake for 32 consecutive hours. No rational person would consider this to be safe.

Fortunately, one of those rational people was James Whitlow, then-chief counsel at the FAA. He was responding to a letter of inquiry from Rich Rubin, a captain at American Airlines who was requesting specific guidance on FAR duty and rest rules when he turned the industry on its ear.

Whitlow’s response was a body blow to the old practice, and it was met with fierce resistance by the Air Transport Association (ATA), the airline trade group. The ATA immediately went to court to try to get the interpretation thrown out; they lost. The new interpretation forced the airlines to consider the start of a reserve period to be the start of duty. In the example above, the pilot would start his reserve at noon and would be released from all duty at 2 a.m., even if he did not report to work until 6 in the evening. In practical terms, in many the duty day was also shortened by virtue of the fact that a pilot who is at home and gets called needs to have time to get to the airport, park, get through security, and check in. Common policy is a 90-minute report time window.

Further, Whitlow also said that in any given 24-hour period, a pilot needs to have at least eight hours of uninterrupted rest.

The airlines realized right away that the Whitlow letter would force them to hire more pilots, and schedulers and pilots both became adept at doing 24 look-backs calculated down to the minute.

While the Colgan crash was the event that forced the FAA to develop a more scientifically based rest rule that takes into account circadian rhythms and the effect of crossing time zones, it was the Whitlow letter that gave the pilot bloc the momentum to start pushing for serious change. Unfortunately, as is so often true in aviation, the rules are often written in blood–in this case Colgan Flight 3407.—Chip Wright

Photo of the Day: Red Bull Air Race

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

When the Red Bull Air Races arrived in the United States in 2010, Alton Marsh and Chris Rose will tell you that they were something to see. Not only were thousands of people treated to the sight of super-fast airplanes roaring around pylons, but the air race grounds themselves were the size of a small town, requiring 12 days to set up and three days to tear down. You can read about what Marsh and Rose witnessed in this article from the August 2010 AOPA Pilot.

Sadly, the races were scratched in 2011 and 2012, but there remains hope that they will go on in 2013. We’re keeping our fingers crossed.—Jill W. Tallman

Catching up with…True Course Flight School

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Just about 18 months ago, I interviewed Jeff Vandeyacht, the proud new owner of True Course Flight School at Oswego County Airport in Fulton, N.Y., for a brief article in the March 2011 issue of Flight Training. At a time when flight training seemed to be hemorraghing student pilots (and we’re not in the clear yet), Jeff had decided to purchase the flight school at his home airport when he found out that the owner was planning to shut it down and retire to Texas.

How’s the flight school doing? I checked in with Jeff this week on a whim, and he quickly got back to me. “We’re doing pretty well,” he reports. True Course has a Cessna 150 and a 172 on the line, as well as a Socata Trinidad on leaseback, which is used for commercial and complex/high-performance training. A tailwheel aircraft is the next planned acquisition.

Jeff hired a retired military pilot who is a part-time instructor, and he has been looking for a full-time CFI for months. “We’re busy enough that a person could make a fair living,” he says. (So, CFIs, if you’re looking for a change of venue, please give Jeff a call. Click here for the website.) Four or five students are preparing to take their private pilot checkrides in the next month.

Jeff went into this with the desire to provide quality training as well as a learning atmosphere where students can feel connected and excited about their progress. He regularly posts students’ accomplishments on a Facebook page, along with photos like the one you see here of Kevin Todd earlier this month. And yes, solo students get their very own T-shirt to commemorate the great day.

Shortly after Jeff got back to me, a prospect came in to True Course Flight School. After a tour, a review of the aircraft and the syllabus, “he’s all in and he starts his training tomorrow,” Jeff reported. “I think you’re bringing me luck!” Maybe, but the more likely explanation is that the prospect liked what he saw–a flight school whose owner is knowledgeable about business and good customer service, as well as someone who can help him make his aviation dream a reality.—Jill W. Tallman

The Places You’ll Go: An ice runway in New Hampshire

Friday, February 24th, 2012

“The Places You’ll Go” is an occasional series of blog posts from Flight Training readers about the adventures they experience with a new pilot certificate. We hope these posts will inspire you to press on to the finish line of your own certificate. If you would like to submit a post, email Jill Tallman.—Ed.

On final to Alton Bay, New Hampshire

When we first get the itch to become an aviator, there could be a number of reasons why. Some folks become pilots to make a living flying. Some just for fun. Then there are the ones who do it to test their skills, explore, and enjoy the many destinations that are out there.

Recently my flying partner and best friend Frank Grossman and I fulfilled one of our “bucket list” flying destinations…Alton Bay, New Hampshire. B18 is located at the southern tip of Lake Winnipesaukee and is the only registered ice landing airport in the continental United States. (Ed. note: It’s a seaplane base in the summer.) For a very short period in January and February, the lake freezes over enough to allow general aviation aircraft to land. Frank owns a beautiful 1965 Cherokee 260 Six, which we take all over the place when the opportunity arises.

The day of our trip starting out at Greater Rochester International Airport, we were blessed with clear skies and a nice tailwind to boot. Thirty miles from the bay we encountered clouds and winds, which only got more intense as we got closer. The approach from the south using Runway 1 requires you to make a short-field landing over the hill and trees with swirling winds for us that day were 23 gusting to 31 straight down our nose. The runway was marked by cones since there was not a hint of snow, making it slick glare ice, so braking was pretty much nil! The outside air temp was around 20 degrees but the winds were strong, giving us concern for the Six to get pushed around; chocks were useless unless they had nails driven into the bottoms.

After enjoying a tasty burger and fries while meeting some of the friendly locals, we received our certificate for skillfully landing on the ice. Frank and I loaded up the Six, pointed back into the 30-knot headwind, and were airborne in about 500 feet. The local folks had asked if we could do a return for approach from the north so they could get some photos. Of course we could, it was our pleasure. The winds are very tricky in that end of the lake, which cuased a couple moments of “let’s think this through” before we proceeded. Once clear of the lake, we pointed the nose skyward for the journey back home to KROC, still enjoying some gusty winds. We reached our cruise altitude of 8,500 feet and began to enjoy some much calmer air that only got smoother as the sun started to settle.

Some folks might ask why someone would even consider taking a flight like this knowing that you could run into unfavorable conditions and not be able to get to your primary destination. We as pilots train, train, and train some more so that we have all of the variables in place regarding each and every situation. Safety is first and foremost; it is the number one item at the top of the list with no substitutes. We plan, lay out our options, and go if everything looks right–no second guesses. So why did Frank and I make this trip to such a beautiful destination? To enjoy the rewards of experiencing just such a flight that tested our skills, to explore a place that we had only heard of, and to be able to pass on to others…because we are pilots. Now if you will excuse me, I need to finish up planning our next trip. Blue skies, tailwinds, and most of all, let’s be safe out there. —Pat Collins