Posts Tagged ‘Mike Fizer’

Photo of the Day: Beech Sierra 200

Friday, March 1st, 2013

 

 This isn’t just any Beech Sierra 200—it happens to be the very first one off the production line. At the time Mike Fizer shot this photo, the Sierra 200 was owned by Hamilton Rial III of Austin, Texas.

Senior Editor Al Marsh gave the Sierra a once-over for his July 2005 AOPA Pilot article, “Budget Buy: Cargo Sierra,” which you can read online. In it, he notes some of the airplane’s attributes—it has six seats (or four seats and a huge cargo area); a large cabin with twin front doors (for 1971 and later models )—and some of its lesser qualities: Parts are scarce and expensive; cabin noise is high; and the airplane isn’t known to be a speed demon.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: P-51 Mustang

Friday, December 14th, 2012

 

When AOPA unveiled its “March Madness”-style airplane face-off this year, some of our members were cynical. “Why bother?” one said. “It’s going to be the P-51 Mustang.” Turns out he was right—the Mustang walked away with the contest, beating out the Douglas DC-3. Mike Fizer shot this photo in Columbus, Ohio, for the Gathering of P-51s and Legends. A very few airplanes command the power to stop you in your tracks whenever you see one, and the P-51 is preeminent among them.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Pattern or practice area?

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

So, what’ll it be today? A trip or two (or 10) around the pattern, or a jaunt to the practice area to practice maneuvers? Maybe a little of both? If you’re flying solo, make sure you have a plan for your valuable Hobbs time. Don’t just fire up the airplane and start taxiing. Sure, all flight time is good time, but it’s also somewhat expensive time. So figure out what you’re going to do before you do it, and make your solo time count. Photo by Mike Fizer.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Diamond in the Rockies

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

It looks like it’s taking a sunny-day flight in the high country, but this Diamond C1 Eclipse is on a mission: It’s actually simulating landing too long at an airport. Mike Fizer shot this photo in 2004 near the front range of the Rocky Mountains near Denver, Colorado. Why was the Diamond pilot settting up for a too-long landing? Because we asked him to. We keep a catalogue of images to illustrate our magazine articles, but in general we assign one of our photographers to work with a pilot to get the imagery we need.—Jill W. Tallman