Posts Tagged ‘Idaho’

Photo of the Day: Quest Kodiak

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Sometimes mistaken at first glance for a Cessna Caravan, the Quest Kodiak was designed specifically for bush flying (something the Caravan can’t claim, since it was intended to carry air freight from one hard surface to another). The Kodiak is quite at home in the backcountry and in remote mountainous areas. Quest Aircraft Co. was founded with the sole purpose to create an aircraft that would allow missionary and humanitarian organizations to safely perform their work around the world. The aircraft are built in Sandpoint, Idaho. As Senior Editor Dave Hirschman found when he flew the Kodiak, you can land the Kodiak gently, or you can land it short–but you can’t land it gently and short. He writes more in the March 2011 AOPA Pilot.—Jill W. Tallman

The Idaho crash video: This is density altitude

Monday, August 13th, 2012

If you live in the flat lands like I do (303 feet above sea level), you’ve heard about the effects of high density altitude–but maybe it’s still a tough concept to grasp. The air’s less dense so there isn’t as much lift? Huh? AOPA’s aviation subject report puts it like this: “On a hot and humid day, the aircraft will accelerate more slowly down the runway, will need to move faster to attain the same lift, and will climb more slowly.” (There’s a lot more information in the subject report. It’s worth your time to review it, and your CFI will give you a gold star.)

A pilot and three passengers in Idaho have provided us with probably the most compelling, graphic display of high density altitude’s effect on aircraft performance that you could ever hope to see. Please be advised that while all four in the aircraft survived the crash, disturbing footage of the pilot’s injuries appears at 5:20. Click here for the video. Student pilots: You’ll note that the aircraft takes a long, long, long time to lift off from the runway, which was near the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.  

The preliminary NTSB findings for the accident are here.–Jill W. Tallman