Posts Tagged ‘Frederick Municipal Airport’

Report your position, please and thank you

Monday, June 8th, 2015

fdk-towerFrederick Municipal Airport (FDK) became Class D airspace in May 2012. (Three years already? Where has the time gone?) Judging on feedback during a friendly get-together last week between control tower personnel and local pilots, we pilots need to brush up on our communications and directional skills.

Here are some of the issues our controllers raised. While these are specific to FDK, your local controllers may have these on their wish lists as well.

  • Taxi instructions: Make sure you read back your taxi instructions and runway assignment, “else we’re going to pester you until we get those.” Also, when calling for taxi instructions, be ready to actually start taxiing.
  • In the pattern: FDK controllers will invariably instruct us to report mid-field downwind at each pass. They would also like us to indicate how the approach will terminate—is it full stop? touch and go? full stop taxi back? Each of these has an impact on traffic flow. “You’d be surprised how many people get in the pattern and never express their intention.”
  • Position reports: Be as accurate as possible. FDK controllers don’t have radar and can’t easily spot aircraft until they’re three miles from the airport. If we tell them we’re northeast of the airport and we’re actually north (or—worse—northwest), that affects their ability to locate and sequence us. Along these lines, the controllers suggested giving an altitude report so that aircraft in our vicinity, who may not be communicating with the tower but are monitoring the frequency, will know where to look for us.
  • Position reports, part two: “If you’re in the west practice area heading back to the airport, and your compass reads 090, you are not east of the airport.” ‘Nuff said (though I sometimes have to remind myself to look at the bottom of the directional gyro when reporting my position).
  • Read airport notices to airmen. “You would not believe how many people do not.”

I’m glad we had a chance to hear from the folks on the other side of the microphone. If you fly out of a tower-controlled airport, what do you think is on your controllers’ minds? Controllers, we want to hear from you.—Jill W. Tallman

Don’t be left out

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

I took this photo last night en route to my home base of Frederick Municipal Airport. Believe it or not, it was my first night flight in years.

As nice as night flight is, it’s not my favorite. The prospect of losing an engine at night is a little intimidating. My night vision isn’t great. And I had never flown my 1964 Piper Cherokee 140 at night. (Now, you and I know the airplane can’t tell the difference and performs exactly the same. However, the old girl’s panel lights were not very strong, which meant that a flashlight had to be positioned so that it could illuminate the panel from below.)

But a flight instructor in the right seat can do wonders for your self-confidence, and I’ve known that for years. The resulting flight was so enjoyable that I’ve decided to get night current. Our daylight flying window in winter is so constrained; it just seems wasteful to let perfectly good flying time slip through my hands just  because the sun has gone down.

If you’re experiencing internal unease with any other aspect of your flying–whether that is stall recovery, short-field landings, or instrument proficiency–a flight instructor is your best friend. Don’t let fears and worries prevent you from enjoying your flying privileges. Train, prepare, get help, and go flying.—Jill W. Tallman

How we get the shots: May 2012 cover

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Call us wimps, but your Flight Training editors weren’t willing to put a perfectly good airplane down in a field so as to provide that extra level of realism needed to illustrate “You Were Ready for This,” which appears on p. 24 of the May 2012 issue.

But we–that is, I was willing to allow my 1964 Piper Cherokee to be towed into the grass beside Taxiway H at Frederick Municipal Airport. Then, photographer Chris Rose took to the skies in a helicopter (supplied by Advanced Helicopter Concepts) to get shots of my airplane from overhead.

Chris Anderberg, who works in our accounting and finance department, portrayed a pilot who has successfully executed an off-airport landing and is checking out the possible “damages.” (We often grab unsuspecting colleagues out of their cubicles and offices to play bemused, scared, excited, or frustrated pilots. They usually deliver the goods.)

With base shots in place, Rose used Photoshop to remove the surrounding airport environment (which includes a row of hangars, runways, taxiways, and a brand-new air traffic control tower) and put in some furrows.

Now that you know, how do you think he did? –Jill W. Tallman