Posts Tagged ‘flight instructor’

Just ahead in the August issue

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

 What does your flight instructor pound into your brain this time of year? (At least we hope your flight instructor is pounding this into your brain.) Density altitude.

We’re not going to stray from that path. Hot weather and airplanes have a long and complicated relationship, and you need only look on YouTube to see lots of evidence of what happens when you don’t calculate density altitude. (This clip, which shows in-cockpit footage from a 2012 crash, is particularly educational. The four occupants of the Stinson did walk away from the crash.)

That’s why our Technique and Weather articles this month are devoted to density altitude. You can’t learn too much about it, particularly if you are a flat-land pilot who may be tempted to assume—incorrectly—that density altitude is something you don’t have to think about.

Also in our August issue:

  • Energy management: Does throttle control altitude or airspeed? What role does the elevator play? We break down energy principles of motion control in four steps.
  • Keep yourself sharp: Now that you’re a certificated pilot, just how sharp are you? Here are some ways to keep yourself in the student mindset.
  • Buddy system: Why should you be a safety pilot? We tell you all the reasons.

Also: A marriage made in aviation heaven; an interview with Living in the Age of Airplanes and One-Six Right director Brian J. Terwilliger.

The August digital edition goes live on June 23. Learn more about how you can get the magazine delivered to your tablet, computer, or mobile device here.

In-home delivery begins July 2, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of July 14.

We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Gian gets an angel

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015
Gian takes his introductory flight in a Cessna 150 in Miami.

Gian takes his introductory flight in a Cessna 150 in Miami.

For many of you, Greg Brown’s monthly colum “Flying Carpet” is appointment reading when you receive your new issue of Flight Training. If so, likely you recall April’s edition, “Tomorrow’s Pilot,” in which Greg introduced you to a 13-year-old named named Gian who loves aviation.

Greg bought Gian an introductory flight lesson. Long story short, he wanted to do something nice for Gian, and he could tell that the young man would appreciate the gift.

The column ends with an ecstatic Gian telling Greg, “I was surprised with myself! It was like I had previous flying experience.”

But Gian’s story doesn’t end there. A reader (who will remain anonymous) has offered to contribute $500 to Gian’s flying future. He and Greg are conferring on how best to do that, given that Gian is more than two years from being able to solo.

The good news doesn’t stop there. A reader in Long Island, New York, reached out to Greg as well. “I own a Cessna 172H [that I] keep at Brookhaven Airport (HWV) and my son is a CFII and multi CFII. If you hear of anyone who is interested in aviation and is in this area we’d love to give them the chance to really see how exciting it is to fly.”

It seems like we have a small movement afoot here. We’ll keep you posted.—Jill W. Tallman

 

Just ahead in the March issue

Friday, January 23rd, 2015
Best Flight School, Paragon Flight in Fort Myers, Florida.

Best Flight School, Paragon Flight in Fort Myers, Florida.

Top of the heap, cream of the crop. Our annual Flight Training Excellence Awards issue spotlights the best flight instructor and flight school, as chosen by you, our readers. If you’re not geographically close to these winners, fear not—the complete list of highly scoring instructors and flight schools may have a candidate within reach.

Also in this issue:

  • Did you forget something? 10 key tips that should be mentioned every time you fly—but frequently aren’t.
  • Technique: iPad preflight. It seems unusual to think of prepping an electronic device for flight, but these steps will keep your device working more efficiently for you.
  • Flight Lesson: Second solo spin. Practicing stalls by himself, this newly soloed student found himself in a bad spot.
  • Debrief: Bob Pittman. The man who launched the MTV Networks says he likes “anything that goes fast.”

The March digital edition goes live on Jan. 27. Learn more about how you can get the magazine delivered to your tablet, computer, or mobile device here.

In-home delivery begins Feb. 5, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of Feb. 17. We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

 

Time for a change?

Friday, January 2nd, 2015

06-492  Learn to FlyThe flight school closed; your favorite CFI got a job with the airlines; you like your flight school but you don’t like driving 50 miles to get to it. Whatever the reason, sometimes you need a change.

If you’re searching for a new flight school or flight instructor, AOPA has some tools that can help you with your search.

  • Our online flight school directory lets you plug in a ZIP code and search parameters (25 to 100 miles). Find it here.
  • Our online flight instructor directory lets you search for a CFI by city and state. Find it here.
  • AOPA Airports is an online database of public and private use airports. Although most pilots use this as a flight planning tool, you can check to see if an airport has a flight school by searching for the airport, then click the “Services, Businesses & FBOs” link at the top of each listing.
  • This is more hit or miss, but you might also post a question on the AOPA Forums. (They’re found here.) There are regional forums, and you also can post learn-to-fly questions in the Left Seat/Right Seat forum.

Seek and ye shall find! Good luck with your flying endeavors in this brand-new year.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

Filling the gap

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Check Out ChecklistMuch has been made of the new federal aviation regulations that require new airline pilots to have at least 1,500 hours. This is really no different than the way the old supply-and-demand system used to work. By that I mean that fewer than 20 years ago, a budding airline pilot wasn’t getting hired unless his or her logbook showed this kind of time or close to it. It’s only been in the last 10 to 12 years that we saw the serious decline in total hours among new-hire pilots—to the point that they were getting hired at 250 hours of total time.

If you are looking to get hired at the regionals, the best route to the 1,500 hours is flight instructing (this assumes you don’t qualify for one of the total time reductions). As a busy CFI, you can rack up 700 to 800 hours a year, and you can do it without paying for it. That alone will give you an idea of how much you can expect to fly as a professional pilot. Regional pilots can expect to average 800 hours a year once they are no longer on reserve.

At the risk of sounding old-fashioned, back in the day, teaching is what we did to earn our time.

What’s more important is that you find a way to take advantage of that gap in hours. If you have students who can afford it or are adventurous, try to arrange for some fairly long cross-country trips. Mind you, I’m not suggesting that you try to rip someone off or take advantage of them, but if you can meet a legitimate teaching need while fulfilling other obligations, you might be able to reach a mutually beneficial end point.

For example, I had a student who wanted to go to EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh one year, and he wanted to take his girlfriend and a buddy. They were retired, and affording it was not a concern. The only airplane that would work was a twin-engine Piper Aztec. As a result, my boss and I went along, and so did my girlfriend. The airplane was loaded up, and off we went. I flew the entire trip and picked up a dozen or so hours of much-needed multiengine time, along with great cross-country and real IFR experience, and it didn’t cost me a dime except for my food. My student even covered my housing.

The following year, I had another student who had bought a warbird Cessna 172 and wanted to fly to Oshkosh. Once again, I was intimately involved in the planning and logistics. She flew under Foggles for most of the round trip, and this time I also got paid for the time I was there (I was busy enough at the school that I couldn’t afford to leave and not get paid for missed work).

Advertise your services to local newspapers that need aerial photos, and look for opportunities to fly actual IFR as much as possible. Go into complex airspace, and get some night experience. If you have a client who is buying an airplane (or delivering one), try to get a ride.

The gap between getting your commercial and CFI is your chance to shine. Do what you can to make your experience stand out. This will not only help you get a job, but it will also help prevent burnout and boredom from doing the same thing every day. Polish your customer service skills and expand your knowledge. Be ready and able to answer any questions any client or student might have, especially if they are in the market to buy an airplane.

It sounds daunting to get the 1,500 hours to get hired, and if you need to pay-as-you-go, it is. But if you can get paid and get great experience, then it’s not only doable, it’s fun, exciting, and a grand opportunity. Take advantage of it!—By Chip Wright

CFI: Curious Flying Individual, Crazy Flying w/Idiots, Can’t Fly Inough

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

Jean Moule last wrote for the Flight Training blog about a flight lesson in a Grumman Tiger. She is an emerita faculty member of Oregon State University, and a published writer and artist. Visit her website.—Ed.

Who knew that a closed flight school would open the door (you get in, open it, and he gets in) to so many styles and manners of certificated flight instructors? Really, I am not checking them out for my next CFI. I am simply learning from them. In January, with 15 hours under my left seat and a long way from solo in 2015, I decided to see how many CFIs I could fly with in 2014.

Jean's logbook, with endorsements from some of her many CFIs

Jean’s logbook, with entries from some of her many CFIs.

I get itchy to go up only once a month, so I am not expecting much progress until I settle down with a field, an airplane, and an instructor.

While I have the time and money to progress as fast as I want in learning to fly, I am in no rush. I plan to take three years to solo. This puts me into a unique category. I would like to become competent flying an airplane, yet I am not interested in continuing on to my pilot certificate (or so I say now).

In one blog I read, “Twenty hours to solo at age 21, and one hour for each year of age after that.” While my hours are slowly creeping up with much review and some new material, at age 68, I will not panic until my presolo hours hit 50.

I am delighting in each review flight I take with different instructors in different airplanes at different airports. I am surprised how each CFI adds to my learning and understanding. Each instructor seems to emphasize different aspects or teach/reteach the basics in a different manner. While each skill I use in the air is not a totally new one for me, I learn more each flight. I love the way my prior understandings and my new ones come together to slowly increase my comfort and my skills.

In some ways, checking out new instructors is almost as much fun as flying.

I have had nine different CFIs in 20 hours of instruction. I’ve flown three different types of airplanes; most were Cessna 172s.

The CFI entries in my logbook tell you a lot about their levels of expertise and what I learned or reviewed. “Discovery flight,” says one. “Climbs, descents, constant rate and speed, medium turns, trim, taxi, airport and airplane protocol,” says another. And these two CFIs took me up in the same airplane at the same airport, albeit a short 0.3 flight versus a 0.9 flight. One was just starting his time in this role. The other had taught many.

EPSON MFP imageI was quite impressed by the handouts the more experienced instructor gave me before we headed to the airplane. While three of the flight instructors I have flown with handed me a list for radio calls, and the one who took me through my first 14 hours drew many diagrams before our flights, I especially appreciated one handout from this instructor.

The illustrated runway layout included instructions for radio calls and what to do with the instruments at each point on the way to land this particular airplane. I have had less than two hours at airports without towers, so radio calls are a bit different. Abeam the number on the runway on downwind, “Carb heat, cut power, 1st notch flaps, trim to 90 mph.” At 45 degrees and turn to base, “Call base and 2nd notch flaps.” Yes, these become second nature to pilots. Not yet for me. The diagram and the notes are particularly nice to study for this particular airplane and airport.

Another CFI, on a similar airport diagram, included altitude. So many details for landing in the pattern. Complicated considering the ease of takeoff. Once on the runway you just stay straight, throttle on, and lift that nose at speed.

Even the first time up in the air with me, the more experienced flight instructors seem a little bit more confident in talking me into a move rather than taking over the controls. I did understand one grabbing the controls to quickly taxi our small 172 off the runway for a large commercial flight coming in behind us.

Some flight instructors are a master at my comfort level, the absolutely most important factor for me. If I am feeling comfortable in the airplane with the instructor, I remember more and I learn more during the lesson. And that CFI can ask and receive much from me. Steep turns, sure. Stalls, bring them on. No help on the landing. Well…

Instructors vary on how much they talk or tell you what to do, or ask if you feel confident and want to do a maneuver (takeoff for me, fine, landing, talk me down please in the crosswind). Some just confidently expect you to do what they suggest. “Play with it,” one says. And I do. And after he evaluates my skill we play with it even more. Steeper, faster, funner.

Learning something each time. Getting different teaching styles and experiences. One thing though—most have told me that I taxi a little too fast. I think it is because it took me so long to learn it. I promise to get that right next time. Fast taxiing will slow down to match my slow solo progress.

While I have several airports and dozens of flight instructors within an hour of my home, right now I am leaning toward LebanAir Aviation at Lebanon State Airport (S30). The friendliest (and probably cheapest) little airport in Oregon: $80 airplane, $40 instructors.

This might be the one. I have eight more months to check out CFIs. At LebanAir alone, two instructors down (I mean up) and six to go at that small airport.

Six years ago I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa. My guide got ill, and I finished that trek on my own. Polé, polé, slow and steady, was the mantra. Both with and without my guide it worked. Guess I am doing that in learning to fly. I’ll get there slowly. And some CFI and I will land, he or she will get out. This CFI will leave, not because of illness, but because I am ready. The CFI will send me up into those heights. Alone.—Jean Moule

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resources for student pilots. Click here for more information.

The perfect CFI

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

what makes a good flight instructor?We asked the Flight Training Facebook friends to tell us one thing they love about their flight instructors. Judging from their comments, we think we could cook up the perfect CFI using these ingredients. Flight instructors, do you see yourself in these comments?

Two parts great teacher:

“Dana Holliday, because he LOVES his job and flies for the fun of it. Not because he needs to stay current or earn more hours.”—Phillip J. Maschke

“Scott McManus at Wings of Eagles Everything Aviation at Huntsville International Airpor; he inspires confidence, cheerfully adapts his teaching style to my learning style…”—Andrea Atwood

“Harold Price @GGP he loves to teach and talk aviation.”—John Peters

 Two parts experience

“His skills, both as pilot and instructor and obvious love of flying make him a joy to work with!”–Andrea Atwood, talking about Scott McManus

“Thessa at Universal Flight Training, professional and very patient. Demands precision and provides the student the tools to be precise.”—Mark Gatz

“David Hersman at Eagles’ Wings Flight Training, been there for years with 8,000+ hours in his C150. Really knows his stuff!”—Joel Thomas

A side of safety

“Capt Bundock, plants the discipline of flying from scratch. ‘Never change your attitude with the trimmer'”—Martin Asare

The patience of Job

“Terry Anderson at Flyboys, 6A2……he’s an awesome teacher and is very patient with his students…really glad I found him!”—Scott Beard

“Stuart Cook at Skyward Aviation, Santa Monica, CA. Smart, patient, great at explaining and teaching, calm and a great person!”—Renee Engel

“My instructor was an older woman named Rose. She flew for the Army Air Corps and taught her son who became a commercial pilot. Great gal and patient with a then young woman with more bravery than brains. :)—Suzanne Day
 
 “Ben Chapman and Kendall Young! I’m taking more time than usual to get my private pilot’s license and they have been very patient with me!”—Chris Nolen
“Allan C. Burke a great Christian man with patience and a great friend.”—Nick Reed

A bit of fun, just for good measure

“Jonathan Bishop from Cal Airways flight school Hayward, CA. Very passionate about aviation I’ve learned so much plus he makes ground school and flying fun.”—Anthony Hayes

“Paul Jacob, patient , smart. And fun to fly with him.”—Michael McShane

“Tristan Wright @ Skywings Okotoks, flexible schedule and doesn’t mind repeating briefs or flights to ensure I got it. We even did a ‘let’s just fly for fun’ day instead of a lesson.”—Robert Manahan

If you missed the original Facebook post and would like to salute your flight instructor, please do so in the Comments. Or, add your own thoughts about what makes the perfect flight instructor!—Jill W. Tallman
 
Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

Aaron Tippin gets his CFI

Thursday, January 16th, 2014
aaron tippin performs at sun 'n fun 2009

Aaron Tippin performs at Sun ‘n Fun 2009. He recently earned a CFI.

How cool is this? Aaron Tippin—country music star, passionate pilot, and all-around nice guy—earned his CFI late in 2013 at Murfreesboro Airport in Tennessee.

AOPA members know that when it comes to airplanes, Tippin is one of us—literally and figuratively. He loves to fly. He’s a longtime member, and in 2002 he showed up at AOPA’s doorstep for a headquarters tour. He had come to Frederick, Md., to perform at the Great Frederick Fair that year.

I recall Tippin spied a copy of Flight Training that had recently come from the press. “I don’t have that one,” he said. I tried to give it to him, but he thought I was asking for an autograph, and he promptly obliged.

I interviewed Tippin in 2011 for a Debrief, which you can read here. It’s interesting that, unlike many folks in the entertainment industry who learn to fly as a hobby, Tippin planned to be an airline pilot. When the energy crunch of the 1970s made that dream fade, he decided that the second-best thing he liked was to pick up a guitar and sing.

Tippin flies his Stearman in the video for “Ready to Rock (In a Country Kind of Way).”—Jill W. Tallman

Nana Jean faces a challenge

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

After reading a letter to the editor in the June Flight Training about a lack of women and minorities represented in aviation, Jean Moule sent this previously published blog to Editor Ian Twombly. We post it here with her permission.—Ed.

Jean Moule and her flight instructor, Steve Larsen.

Jean Moule and her flight instructor, Steve Larsen.

“75765, is there an instructor on board?” My erratic taxiing had been noted by the control tower. The basics seemed so difficult. Maybe it was a good thing that the threatening weather kept my instructor and me on the ground in our plane.

I stared through the raindrops on the aircraft windshield. Would I ever learn to fly? I have seen my grandchildren and my students begin a difficult task, become frustrated and put the material or task down with a sigh, lacking the will to continue. I have learned how to help them move past the barriers to try again. Could I do that for myself?

Rarely in my adult life have I faced tasks I found challenging beyond learning a new skill on the computer or how to work a new appliance or gadget. And rarely do these tasks have high emotional impact or the kinds of pressure one may experience when the task is complex, cognitively difficult and watched over intently by a teacher.

Perhaps I needed a reminder of such experiences. Five years ago in “Ask Nana Jean” I wrote about my climb up Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and concluded with my desire to reach more heights. Climb another mountain? Learn to fly? And that is how I found myself behind the controls of an airplane, I in the pilot seat and the instructor on controls on the right. Could I reach high places in a plane?

This was my 3rd lesson; this time with a substitute instructor. The checklist with 120 items and a cockpit with a lot more dials than a car seemed bewildering. Afterwards, as I paid for my half hour on the ground my head filled over and over with “Why am I doing this?” I reminded myself: I want to learn to fly…

  •  Because I like heights.
  • Because I want additional perspectives.
  • Because I need exhilaration and a new challenge.

I drove home feeling dejected, the rain and gray clouds matching my mood. I knew that at some point I would have to find the reserves to try again. I tried to encourage myself by thinking about other challenging things I have accomplished:

  •  Remember learning to drive a car?
  • Remember handling an excavator that one time?
  • Remember learning to ski or pull a sled while on ski patrol?
  • Remember learning to teach!

I made a list of resolutions and requests that I believed would help me continue on:

  •  Get a copy of the preflight checklist and go over it at home
  • Get a life-sized poster of the cockpit and practice touching the right switches
  • Ask my instructor to taxi next time to at least get us off the ground

And finally, I remembered the pleasure I receive when my own students begin to grasp a concept that is hard for them. So my final reason for continuing with my lessons? My instructors may feel blessed when their challenging and challenged student finally makes progress. They, too, will have a student whose success they will remember fondly…when she finally leans to fly solo.

Ten days later:

I flew today. My instructor watched as I turned the plane over our house, circled the small town of Lyons where we used to live, flew over the road I take to work. Up and down. Level flight, smooth turns and a deep satisfaction. Now I need to learn to take off and land!

What a contrast to just a few days ago when I almost put down my pilot log-book for good.

My words for myself and others: when the journey gets tough, be strong and continue on. No matter how long it takes.—Jean Moule 

Jean Moule is an emerita faculty member of Oregon State University, and a published writer and artist. Visit her website.—Ed.

The March “Since You Asked” poll: Two at a time?

Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

In the March issue, we asked digital subscribers whether they have ever tried to train with two instructors at the same time. The question was sparked by a situation in Rod’s column that involved a student pilot who was getting frustrated with the pace of his training. His instructor didn’t want to work weekends, which meant between his own work schedule and weather, he wound up flying only a few times a month. While he enjoyed working with the CFI, he wanted to keep moving forward. The CFI had promised him that he would more time to devote to the student’s training in a month.

It’s generally not a good idea to work with more than one CFI at a time, but I get the sentiment behind the student’s question. Rod said:

“It’s simply too easy for you to become confused when another instructor—one who has different training priorities and methods than your primary instructor—contradicts your previous learning (and yes, there’s a very good chance that this will happen).”

Our poll respondents generally had not flown with more than one CFI at a time, although not quite in the overwhelming numbers I’d predicted. Here are the results:

  • 56 percent had not.
  • 39 percent had.
  • 5 percent had not, but were considering doing just that.

What do you think? And if you’ve flown with more than one instructor (at the same time), I’d love to hear how that turned out for you.—Jill W. Tallman