Posts Tagged ‘first solo’

Time to get serious

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Adam Brement soloed April 18 in a bright-red Cherokee 140 at Griffiss International Airport (KRME) in Rome, N.Y. Here’s his story.—Ed.

Adam Brement (right) with his grandfather, Luigi Bottini.

Adam Brement (right) with his grandfather, Luigi Bottini.

I have been flying my entire life. I grew up around aviation, all thanks to my grandfather, Luigi Bottini. Luigi is a Master CFII. He owned and operated a flight school called Galaxy Aviation. I officially started logging hours back in 1992 but never had the consistency to apply the knowledge and hours to solo. Back then dating my high school sweetheart had taken priority over flying.

But over the years after high school and college I married my high school sweetheart, started a family, and am now the proud owner of Galaxy Aviation Flight School & Pilots Club. Since taking over the reins of the flight school, I figured I should get serious about getting my license.

Adam on solo day, in Rome, N.Y.

Adam on solo day, in Rome, N.Y.

On April 18, 2014, I finally got the opportunity to solo! What a surreal feeling. After all these years of flying with my grandfather (best friend) by my side, I was now about to be all by my lonesome. It was awesome. I took what seemed like an eternity to do my preflight check/runup, double checking everything, I didn’t want to miss a thing. The tower cleared me for takeoff, and down Runway 15 I went.

Takeoff went beautiful. I climbed to 1,500 feet, made left traffic, and proceeded to fly the pattern. As I came around for my landing I had everything lined up and it was smooth. I did it!

I talked to myself out loud through the whole thing making sure not to forget anything. My grandfather is 80 yrs old, and is my best bud. We fly every chance we get. I spent my summer vacations from the age of 12 till I was 18 flying cross-country to Oshkosh, Wis. I know my grandfather couldn’t be more proud of my accomplishment.

On top of running the flight school, I am the director of maintenance for Saint John The Baptist Roman Catholic Church in Rome, N.Y. I am in charge of the maintenance for the buildings and grounds of two churches in our parish. In the winter I am a level 1 hockey coach, and I coach my son’s hockey team. My wife and I also run the Cub Scout/Boy Scout program in the city of Rome. I have two kids, son Kyle, 7, and daughter Emily, 10. I hope to someday pass this experience on to my kids.—Adam Brement

Are you interested in learning to fly? Would you like to experience the thrill of flying an airplane by yourself, like Adam did? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resources for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Time flies when you’re landing an Airbus on the Hudson

Friday, January 10th, 2014

Hard to believe that January 15, 2014, marks the five-year anniverary of the day that will always be known as “Miracle on the Hudson.”

As most of us recall, US Airways Flight 1549, piloted by Capt. Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger and First Officer Jeffrey Skiles, landed in the Hudson River in New York after striking a flock of Canada geese. Both engines failed on climbout from LaGuardia Airport in New York City en route to Charlotte, North Carolina. Sullenberger decided they didn’t have enough altitude to turn back or make an emergency landing at Teterboro, New Jersey. He told New York Tracon, “We’re gonna be in the Hudson,” and that was the last transmission from the airplane before it touched down in the river.

Just writing that last sentence gave me goosebumps.

Thankfully, all turned out well. All passengers and crew were evacuated safely.

Now retired from US Airways, Sullenberg remains an active and vocal figure in the aviation industry. Jeppesen created an approach plate commemorating the “Miracle” landing.

Skiles took a leave of absence from the airline and is working for the Experimental Aircraft Association. He eventually got a seaplane rating, too [insert your own joke here].

One of the passengers on that fateful flight went on to earn a private pilot certificate. I interviewed Clay Presley shortly after his solo for this Flight Training magazine article, and you can hear him tell the story of the Miracle on the Hudson from the point of view of someone who was sitting in the cabin section on this AOPA Live video.  —Jill W. Tallman

This entry was edited to correct the date to Jan. 15—Ed.

The July “Since You Asked” poll: How many hours to solo?

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

For some, it’s a badge of honor. For most of us, it is what it is. We’re talking about the number of hours it took you to solo.

We asked that question of digital subscribers in the July issue of Flight Training magazine, and here’s what you said.

The majority of respondents–39 percent–said it took from 11 to 20 hours to solo.

More interesting–or troubling, depending on your viewpoint–37 percent said it took more than 20 hours to solo.

Just 10 percent had soloed in 10 or fewer hours, and 14 percent said they hadn’t soloed yet.

Our poll is admittedly very unscientific since we don’t draw from a very large sample. Still, it raises some interesting questions. Are we taking longer to solo? If so, why?  Is it the aircraft? Are instructors trying to make sure that students know more before they sign them off for solo? Are we just slower? (I offer that last one in jest, sort of.)

It’s expected that people who aren’t teenagers might take a little longer to solo. A student who has logged well into 20 or more hours, however, runs the risk of becoming frustrated, and we all know where that road leads.

Your thoughts?—Jill W. Tallman

“Since You Asked” polls appear monthly in the digital edition of Flight Training. If you’d like to switch your magazine from paper to digital at no additional charge, go here or call Member Services 800-USA-AOPA weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern.