Posts Tagged ‘AOPA Pilot’

Photo of the Day: Anderson-Greenwood AG-14

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Anderson-Greenwood AG-14Is it a high-wing Ercoupe? Is it a forerunner to the Cessna Skymaster?

The Anderson-Greenwood AG-14 is neither, but its history is a fascinating look back to the post-World War II boom in aviation that was widely predicted but never materialized. (The thought was that military pilots would come home and continue to fly, thus propelling the need for new airplane designs.)

A few characteristics of the AG-14:

  • 90-hp Continental engine with a pusher prop
  • Four (yes, four) pedals to operate: two for the single rudder, one for the hydraulic brakes, and one (actually a foot button) used to engage the electric starter
  • Two seats plus a baggage compartment that could hold 250 pounds

There’s much more in the pilot report that Barry Schiff wrote for the November 2004 issue of AOPA Pilot, and I hope you’ll read it. The AG-14 he flew is one of only five built, and thought to be one of just two in existence.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: AirCam

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

The first time you see an AirCam, you do a double-take. The small twin engines and open cockpit are eye-catching, to say the least. Every pilot I’ve known who’s flown this unusual multiengine Experimental has fallen in love with it. AOPA Pilot Senior Editor Dave Hirschman has made a couple of ferry flights in them, and even when the temps require him to wear a flight suit, he can’t say enough about the perspective one gets from the front seat of the AirCam. Here’s a report he wrote up after ferrying one to Florida with Pilot Getaways co-founder John Kounis. and if you click this link you can watch a video of Hirschman flying the AirCam on another trek—this time from Florida to Minneapolis.—Jill W. Tallman

 Air Cam

Photo of the Day: Ford Tri-Motor

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Ford Tri-Motor

Not only can you get a type rating in a Ford Tri-Motor (assuming you already have a private pilot certificate), but you can get a type rating in the very airplane shown in this photo. Barry Schiff did just that, and wrote about it in the May 2010 AOPA Pilot (“Tin Goose”).

The company, Ford Type Ratings, is located at Valle Airport near Flagstaff, Ariz. The full three-day type rating costs $10,900, not including the examiner’s fee. A second-in-command type rating is available for $2,900. Schiff called the experience “like flying the pages of history,” and I have to admit it looks like it would be a blast. Of course, you could always purchase a ride in a Tri-Motor at EAA AirVenture and sometimes at airshows. I’ve done that, and it’s a 15-minute slice of fun.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Beech Sierra 200

Friday, March 1st, 2013

 

 This isn’t just any Beech Sierra 200—it happens to be the very first one off the production line. At the time Mike Fizer shot this photo, the Sierra 200 was owned by Hamilton Rial III of Austin, Texas.

Senior Editor Al Marsh gave the Sierra a once-over for his July 2005 AOPA Pilot article, “Budget Buy: Cargo Sierra,” which you can read online. In it, he notes some of the airplane’s attributes—it has six seats (or four seats and a huge cargo area); a large cabin with twin front doors (for 1971 and later models )—and some of its lesser qualities: Parts are scarce and expensive; cabin noise is high; and the airplane isn’t known to be a speed demon.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Dickenson/Howard DGA-21

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

This hybrid Experimental combines aspects of the DGA-15 and the famous DGA-6 racer. Its builder, Bruce Dickenson, dubbed it the Dickenson-Howard DGA-21. The 21 comes from 15 plus 6. It lives at Santa Paula Airport in Southern California, where Dickenson put together his project without blueprints. The airplane has wooden wings and are built from a spruce bar, birch ribs, and mahogany covering. Read much more in the March 2011 AOPA Pilot ( http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2011/march/feature_howard.html ), where you can also view a video of the airplane’s test flight.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Mustang II

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Put the Mustang II next to an RV7 and you might think the two are from the same company. But there are subtle differences. (Hint: Check the shape of the wing and the canopy.)  The Mustang II will soon be able to demonstrate its flying capability against an RV7, as AOPA Pilot editors recently put the two aircraft in a head-to-head competition. Stay tuned!—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Robinson R66

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

Our Hover Power blogger Tim McAdams says the Robinson R66, the company’s first turbine helicopter, feels a little bigger and a little heavier than the piston-powered R44. Its cabin is about eight inches wider than that of the R44. It uses a T-bar cyclic, which means transitioning from the R44 is eaiser. In a full pilot report for the December 2010 AOPA Pilot, McAdams pointed out that the R66 has a sleeker profile along with a Bell JetRanger-style baggage compartment located under the transmission deck. It can hold 300 pounds and “one design objective was for it to be large enough to carry two sets of golf clubs.”—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Lockheed 12A Electra Junior

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

This Lockheed 12A Electra Junior–so called because it’s a bit smaller than the Lockheed Model 10E Electra that Amelia Earhart flew–became the 300th type of aircraft to grace Barry Schiff’s logbook. That’s not Barry in the captain’s seat–it’s Curt “Rocky” Walters, who pilots the aircraft for its owner, Ruth Holden of San Luis Obispo, California. Barry wrote about the Lockheed 12A for the February 2006 AOPA Pilot’s “Proficient Pilot” column.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Curtiss-Wright CW-1 Junior

Friday, September 7th, 2012

It’s a glider! No, there’s an engine on top. A radial engine, at that! It’s a flying boat! No, not exactly. The Curtiss-Wright CW-1 Junior resembles all of these things in various ways–see how the pilot sits out in front, which gives him the same sort of visibility afforded to sailplane pilots; note also how the hull looks like that of an amphibious flying boat. But it’s actually an an open-cockpit landplane. As Barry Schiff writes in the June 2006 AOPA Pilot, the CW-1 Junior was produced in St. Louis, Missouri, competing against the Aeronca C-2, American Eagle’s Eaglet, and the Buhl Pup. Some 270 were built before the Great Depression brought production to a halt in 1932. Barry says the Junior is an airplane that’s “easy to fly, but not easy to fly well.”—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Huskys in formation

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

It’s supposed to be a big secret–or maybe not–but formation flying for photo shoots is one of the coolest things an AOPA editor does. Here, AOPA’s Mike Fizer captures Dwayne Clemens and former AOPA Pilot editor Nate Ferguson in a yellow Husky 200-hp A-1B leading another Husky A-1B with tundra tires flown by Greg Largen and Alex Clemens.—Jill W. Tallman