Archive for the ‘Coming up in Flight Training’ Category

Just ahead in the August issue

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

 What does your flight instructor pound into your brain this time of year? (At least we hope your flight instructor is pounding this into your brain.) Density altitude.

We’re not going to stray from that path. Hot weather and airplanes have a long and complicated relationship, and you need only look on YouTube to see lots of evidence of what happens when you don’t calculate density altitude. (This clip, which shows in-cockpit footage from a 2012 crash, is particularly educational. The four occupants of the Stinson did walk away from the crash.)

That’s why our Technique and Weather articles this month are devoted to density altitude. You can’t learn too much about it, particularly if you are a flat-land pilot who may be tempted to assume—incorrectly—that density altitude is something you don’t have to think about.

Also in our August issue:

  • Energy management: Does throttle control altitude or airspeed? What role does the elevator play? We break down energy principles of motion control in four steps.
  • Keep yourself sharp: Now that you’re a certificated pilot, just how sharp are you? Here are some ways to keep yourself in the student mindset.
  • Buddy system: Why should you be a safety pilot? We tell you all the reasons.

Also: A marriage made in aviation heaven; an interview with Living in the Age of Airplanes and One-Six Right director Brian J. Terwilliger.

The August digital edition goes live on June 23. Learn more about how you can get the magazine delivered to your tablet, computer, or mobile device here.

In-home delivery begins July 2, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of July 14.

We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Just ahead in the July issue

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

09wdr-004_1124The warm weather has (finally!) arrived, and the skies are waiting for you. As we put the finishing touches on the July issue, our theme this month is an invitation for you to celebrate your independence through flight. Here’s what’s on deck:

  • Seize the Sky. What kinds of adventures and opportunities are waiting for you, the brand-new pilot?
  • Mine, All Mine. Time to buy an airplane? Here’s how to make the process less complicated.
  • Technique: The Passenger Briefing. Ways to make it fun and informative for your airborne guests.

Plus: challenging yourself after getting a pilot certificate; an interview with the Breitling Jet Team’s lead pilot; and more.

The July digital edition goes live on May 26. Learn more about how you can get the magazine delivered to your tablet, computer, or mobile device here.

In-home delivery begins June 4, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of June 16.

We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Learn the local weather, wherever you are

Monday, April 13th, 2015

weatherOne of the most important variables in the day-to-day life of a pilot—if not the most important—is weather.

It’s easy to fixate on learning weather patterns in your hometown. After all, it’s where you live, so it just makes sense. But as you expand your horizons, you will learn that weather is called a “variable” for a reason: No two places are the same.

I grew up on the Chesapeake Bay, and there’s a definite annual pattern to the weather. The summers are either hazy, hot, and humid or absolutely gorgeous. There isn’t a lot of in-between, unless you count the torrential rain storms. Lines of thunderstorms can be hit or miss as well, because the Appalachians will affect the extent of continued development before they hit my front door. Falls are brisk; winters are damp and miserable; and spring is the season in which Mother Nature can’t make a decision. Fog is rare, but we had it.

Move forward to my move to Florida, both in college and at my first airline job. There are two seasons in Central Florida, and thus two weather forecasts: pop-up thunderstorms in the summer—as opposed to the fast-moving lines of fury that I’d grown up with—and morning fog in the spring and fall. This was as predictable as Charlie Brown missing the football. And the fog was often so thick you could cut it with a spoon. Carrying extra fuel for holding patterns on morning arrivals was a necessity, as the fog could burn off as quickly as it formed.

In the Midwest, I learned to deal with the same lines of summer storms I’d grown up with, only this time I had to deal with them when they were at maximum strength and fury as they would move across the flat central portion of the country with tremendous speed, unimpeded by terrain, with tops that often exceeded the service ceiling of nearly all jets. I learned firsthand what severe and extreme turbulence feels like, and I don’t need to experience either ever again.

The Midwest also gave me my first exposure to deicing operations, especially with hoar frost, which is extremely common as temperatures begin to fall, even if the precipitation doesn’t. The winters can produce pretty thick fog. This is a major issue in some mountain valleys, especially in the evenings and early mornings. Our late-night flights to Tri-Cities, Tennessee, frequently had to race time to beat the fog that would roll in. Ashville, North Carolina, had similar issues.

Nowadays, my flying takes me around the Pacific. In the winters, the weather is virtually non-existent, and what little there is lends itself to easy visual deviations. In the summers, the storms are much more extensive, but the convective energy is much less concentrated than that in the storms over land. They simply don’t have the heating source. That said, they are to be taken seriously, yet at the same time we are much quicker to pull the trigger on diverting because airports—the islands—are so far apart, and we can only carry so much extra fuel. It’s not unheard of for the weather over or near one of the islands to be just sketchy enough that a crew won’t even attempt an approach. The fuel wasted is better saved for a possible missed approach at the alternate.

Weather and its patterns are unique, and while I don’t profess to have the most intimate understanding that others do, I have stored enough information away in my memory bank that I can put together a plan in fairly short order. Understanding what to expect based on local geography and terrain is a key component to that. In my case, more learning shall occur. I will eventually transfer back to domestic flying, and I have relatively little flying experience west of the Rockies. I’ll be relying on what I’ve read to get by, but not as much as the wisdom of those I’m flying with along with my own eyes.

Wherever your experience takes you, pay attention. It’s information you’ll need later.—Chip Wright

Just ahead in the April issue

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

2009 Senior Soaring ChampionshipsThis winter can’t last much longer…can it? We’re trying to think ahead to spring as we send the April issue to the printer. At least we’re not talking about snow and ice in the “Weather” column this month.

  • Climbing into Gliders. Soaring has a lot to offer, including the fact that it is less expensive than learning to fly a powered airplane, doesn’t require a medical, and teaches you mad stick-and-rudder skills.
  • Please Hold.” How are you going to enter that holding pattern?
  • Seeing is Believing. Why you need to get your eyeballs off the instrument panel when in VFR conditions.

Plus: Turns around a point; pilots who helped to rescue sea turtles; and more.

The April digital edition goes live on Feb. 24. Learn more about how you can get the magazine delivered to your tablet, computer, or mobile device here.

In-home delivery begins March 5, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of March 17.

We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Just ahead in the March issue

Friday, January 23rd, 2015
Best Flight School, Paragon Flight in Fort Myers, Florida.

Best Flight School, Paragon Flight in Fort Myers, Florida.

Top of the heap, cream of the crop. Our annual Flight Training Excellence Awards issue spotlights the best flight instructor and flight school, as chosen by you, our readers. If you’re not geographically close to these winners, fear not—the complete list of highly scoring instructors and flight schools may have a candidate within reach.

Also in this issue:

  • Did you forget something? 10 key tips that should be mentioned every time you fly—but frequently aren’t.
  • Technique: iPad preflight. It seems unusual to think of prepping an electronic device for flight, but these steps will keep your device working more efficiently for you.
  • Flight Lesson: Second solo spin. Practicing stalls by himself, this newly soloed student found himself in a bad spot.
  • Debrief: Bob Pittman. The man who launched the MTV Networks says he likes “anything that goes fast.”

The March digital edition goes live on Jan. 27. Learn more about how you can get the magazine delivered to your tablet, computer, or mobile device here.

In-home delivery begins Feb. 5, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of Feb. 17. We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

 

Just ahead in the February issue

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

FrederickIf you routinely touch down in the first third of the runway and give yourself a pat on the back, Budd Davisson throws down in the gauntlet in our February 2015 issue. “Flying should be a never-ending quest for improvement,” he says. In “On the Numbers,” he tells you how to do just that—land on the numbers.

Also in the issue:

  • Be A Ground Instructor. Talk about flying and get paid for it? Sign us up!
  • Flying the Alphabet. We sent one of our editors on a quest to fly to as many classes of airspace as he could in a single day. Here’s how it turned out.
  • Technique: Anatomy of an Approach. Making the transition from cruise to landing in instrument conditions.
  • Debrief: Chris Meloni. If you’ve ever watched “Law and Order: SVU,” you’ve seen this late-blooming pilot pursue his other passion.

February’s digital edition went live on Dec. 24. In-home delivery concluded Jan. 6, and if you’re not yet a subscriber, you’ll find it on newsstands as of Jan. 13. We welcome your letters to the editor; email flighttraining@aopa.org.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Just ahead in the January issue

Friday, November 14th, 2014

takeoffIf it seems like these posts about upcoming issues are coming closer together, well, they are. Our production schedule is compressed somewhat so that we can publish issues while enjoying the holidays. After January 1, 2015, things will settle down a bit.

With the January issue, we go “back to basics.” We are, first and foremost, a training magazine for aspiring pilots. Longtime readers may recognize that we hit certain subjects—landing, weather, maneuvers—over and over again. That’s the nature of our readership; we cycle through topics for primary flight students, because we expect that they will earn their pilot certificates and perhaps move on to our sister publication, AOPA Pilot.

But we also know that we have a group of faithful readers who stay with Flight Training, because “a good pilot is always learning.” That’s why we try to hit on instrument flying and other advanced pilot topics when we can.

What you can look forward to in the January issue:

  • Trading ground for sky. Few things are more basic in aviation than the takeoff. We perform one on our very first flight lesson. But there are ways to take off, and ways to take off that recognize the aerodynamics and make you look better doing it.
  • Work smarter, not longer. If it’s taking you three-quarters of your lesson to get from startup to takeoff, we have some ideas for you.
  • Wise words: a pilot’s guide to the flying life. There are a lot of sayings in aviation, but we’ve distilled some very basic truisms that can be applied to your daily flying and make you a better pilot.

There’s much more, of course.

Our January issue hits digital devices on Nov. 26 (you can read while you digest your turkey!) and starts in-home delivery Dec. 9. As always, we welcome your letters to the editor (flighttraining@aopa.org).—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

Just ahead in the December issue

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014
Ready to move up in the world?

Ready to move up in the world?

The December issue is our Collegiate/Career issue, and we continue that tradition with feature articles on flying jets and what awaits you when you get that airline job.

We also bring you our comprehensive College Aviation Directory, which lists colleges and universities in the United States that offer an associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s degree in an aviation field. If you know a young person who’s thinking about an aviation degree, by all means hand off your issue–or point him or her to this link, where you will find the 2014 directory in .pdf format. We also have a searchable database, located at this link.

But it’s not all big iron and college stuff. We also bring you:

  • The Cowboy Code: Control your horse before it controls you. Striking parallels between learning to fly and learning to ride a horse.
  • Technique: Medical Certification. Not your regular technique article, but an important part of your path to a private pilot certificate nonetheless.
  • Debrief: Howard Wolvington. Meet the FAA’s 2014 Certificated Flight Instructor of the Year.

Our December issue hits digital devices on Oct. 29 and starts in-home delivery Nov. 4. Happy reading! As always, we welcome your letters to the editor (flighttraining@aopa.org).—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

 

Just ahead in the November issue

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

ian helicopterIt seems ridiculous to be thinking about ice, snow, and frigid temperatures when the rest of the region is still experiencing summerlike weather, but those are the vagaries of our publishing schedule: Our November issue goes to the printer this week. And so we bring you at least one winter-centric article (“Weather: Just Say No—A zero-tolerance policy for snow, ice, and frost,” by Jack Williams).

The rest of our issue concerns topics that could affect your flying no matter what the temperature is.

  • Go Vertical: No more excuses not to fly helicopters. Watch out! Editor Ian Twombly has gone over to the fling-wing side, and in this highly entertaining article he’s determined to take you with him.
  • Escape Plan: Keep a go-around ready whenever you need it. Jamie Beckett wants you to understand not just how to execute a go-around, but when you’ll need them, and why it’s so important.
  • Practical Weather: Five tips for putting your weather knowledge to good use. It’s one thing to memorize weather theory for the checkride, but pilots need to know how to put that theory into practice when it’s time to go on a trip–lest you remain forever in the traffic pattern.

Our November issue hits digital devices on Sept. 24 and starts in-home delivery Sept. 30. Happy reading! As always, we welcome your letters to the editor (flighttraining@aopa.org).—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.

 

Flight school flyouts: We’re outta here

Friday, January 31st, 2014

If your flight school could shake up your training routine by offering you a chance to join other pilots on an organized fly-out, would you go? Most of us would love it. Getting out of the pattern, going places? Getting a taste of what it will be like when we can be pilots in command and go where we want? Where do we sign up?

Many flight schools try to organize these types of events—but they’re not easy to pull off. There’s the weather, availability of airplanes, flight instructors, and a host of other details to consider above and beyond the normal flight scheduling routine. So if your flight school offers you the chance to join a fly-out—whether it’s to the next airport for a pancake breakfast, or to Niagara Falls—don’t wait. Reserve an airplane, get a CFI if you need one, and go. I guarantee you’ll learn a lot and have a great time.

In 2002, as a low-time private pilot, I flew from Maryland to Maine, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and back during a four-day fly-out organized by Frederick Flight Center. There were several student pilots in our group, and everybody gained a great deal of confidence (see “Destination: Experience,” March 2003 Flight Training).

When you read this I’ll be on my way to Florida with a group of airplanes and pilots out of Virginia. The 12 aircraft are leaving this wretched Mid-Atlantic winter behind, temporarily. But we’re not staying in Florida. We’re headed to the Bahamas, accompanied by Bob Hepp, owner of Aviation Adventures. (Aviation Adventures’ Conor Dancy is our 2013 Flight Instructor of the Year, and the school itself has won recognition for high-quality training at its Manassas, Leesburg, and Winchester locations. Some of the airplanes going on this fly-out are on the flight line at Aviation Adventures.)

This will be Aviation Adventures’ third fly-out to the Bahamas. The school also organizes trips to Oshkosh, Wis., for EAA AirVenture, and most recently shepherded a group on a frigid December morning to tour the Hudson River corridor in New York.

A student pilot can’t fly solo outside the United States, of course. He or she can fly accompanied by a certificated pilot who is qualified to act as PIC. But crossing the border in a small airplane is a great adventure and a personal goal for many pilots. And if you have any qualms about Customs procedures, the paperwork, the navigation, and/or the safety equipment needed, a group fly-out is a great way to give it a try. (If you want to get going on the research, see AOPA’s Bahamas resources page. We’ve got info for Alaska, Canada, and Mexico, too.)

I’ll share some of these considerations on the Flight Training blog as we travel, and you’ll see a complete write-up in a future issue of Flight Training magazine. In the meantime, you folks where it’s cold, try to stay warm, and I’ll do the same.—Jill W. Tallman

Are you interested in learning to fly? Sign up for a free student trial membership in the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and receive six issues of Flight Training magazine plus lots of training tools and resouces for student pilots. Click here for more information.