Archive for the ‘Photo of the Day’ Category

Photo of the Day: Greenville, Maine, Splash-In

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

A Cessna 172 taxies past as an Antilles G21G Super Goose lands in the background at Moosehead Lake.

We can’t resist a beautiful photo of a floatplane, and the Seaplane Splash-in at Greenville, Maine, provides some of the best spotting opportunities on the East Coast. This photo is from the 35th annual Splash-In, held in 2008.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Iditarod Air Force

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

Since 1973, Alaska’s annual sled dog race from Anchorange to Nome has depended on a corps of volunteer bush pilots to move people and supplies along the trail. They’ve ferried dog food, bales of straw for dog bedding, wooden stakes to mark the trail, cooking fuel, and lumber to build temperary shelters at checkpoints. They carry veterinarians, race officials, volunteers, and checkpoint staff—and of course, dogs. The Idatarod would not be possible without general aviation. Read much more, and view a slideshow of the event, in Tom LeCompte’s article from the April 2008 issue of AOPA Pilot ( http://www.aopa.org/members/files/pilot/2008/dog0804.html ).—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: The Wrights’ historic flight

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

We know a lot about what happened in the days leading up to Dec. 17, 1903—the day that two brothers named Orville and Wilbur Wright accomplished their first successful flight of a powered aircraft. The brothers were meticulous about taking notes and photos of their progress, and so we have photographic evidence of that day. The Wright Flyer was constructed of spruce and ash covered in muslin. Look for an explanation of how the Wrights controlled the airplane in the February issue of Flight Training magazine.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: P-51 Mustang

Friday, December 14th, 2012

 

When AOPA unveiled its “March Madness”-style airplane face-off this year, some of our members were cynical. “Why bother?” one said. “It’s going to be the P-51 Mustang.” Turns out he was right—the Mustang walked away with the contest, beating out the Douglas DC-3. Mike Fizer shot this photo in Columbus, Ohio, for the Gathering of P-51s and Legends. A very few airplanes command the power to stop you in your tracks whenever you see one, and the P-51 is preeminent among them.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Maule M-4

Monday, December 10th, 2012

There are taildraggers, and then there’s the Maule. The Maule family has been building sturdy tailwheel airplanes known for their short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability from the factory in Moultree, Georgia, since the 1950s. This one provides side-by-side seating, somewhat unusual for a taildragger but a definite selling point. Alton Marsh, who’s flown more than a few Maules in his career, describes the characteristics of the Maule M-4 shown here in the article, “Back to the Future,” which originally appeared in the March 2005 AOPA Pilot magazine. (  http://www.aopa.org/pilot/features/2005/feat0503.html ) —-Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Anchorage nose art

Friday, December 7th, 2012

On May 19, 2007, AOPA Pilot editors were literally all over the map–all of us were stationed at airports around the United States to capture images and words for what would become “A Day in the Life of America’s Airports.” Then-Senior Editor Machteld Smith got a plumb assignment: She went to Lake Hood Seaplane Base in Anchorage. The nose art you see here is one of numerous photos taken that day. You can see a slideshow and a video on the website, http://www.aopa.org/pilot/dayinthelife/ ), as well as check out the other locations where we turned up.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Pattern or practice area?

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

So, what’ll it be today? A trip or two (or 10) around the pattern, or a jaunt to the practice area to practice maneuvers? Maybe a little of both? If you’re flying solo, make sure you have a plan for your valuable Hobbs time. Don’t just fire up the airplane and start taxiing. Sure, all flight time is good time, but it’s also somewhat expensive time. So figure out what you’re going to do before you do it, and make your solo time count. Photo by Mike Fizer.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Red Bull Air Race

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

When the Red Bull Air Races arrived in the United States in 2010, Alton Marsh and Chris Rose will tell you that they were something to see. Not only were thousands of people treated to the sight of super-fast airplanes roaring around pylons, but the air race grounds themselves were the size of a small town, requiring 12 days to set up and three days to tear down. You can read about what Marsh and Rose witnessed in this article from the August 2010 AOPA Pilot.

Sadly, the races were scratched in 2011 and 2012, but there remains hope that they will go on in 2013. We’re keeping our fingers crossed.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: A sea of Swifts

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

The group photo of Swift pilots you see here was taken on November 4 to commemorate “World Domination: The Day of the Swift.” This friendly Facebook event was started by a Fort Myers, Fla.-based Swift owner who got to wondering one day how many Swifts were flying at the same time. He decided to see if he could get international interest among Swift owners to fly on the same day; thus the name “World Domination.” Perry Sisson asked participating pilots to email photos and updates; he estimates that 100 Swifts were flown on that one day in the United States, Canada, Brazil, and France.—Jill W. Tallman

Photo of the Day: Get Your Glass Piper Archer

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

AOPA’s 2008 sweepstakes airplane was notable for several reasons. We had previous refurbished Pipers, but this was the first time we had awarded an airplane with a brand-new “glass” panel–an Avidyne multifunction display and Aspen Avionics’ first-ever certified primary display. Another notable first for this aircraft was that its winner is a lady. And, unlike many previous winners of AOPA sweepstakes airplanes, she has kept N208GG. Karoline Gorman is an air traffic controller for New York Center and a passionate advocate for animal rescue, and she enjoys flying N208GG on rescue missions.—Jill W. Tallman