Posts Tagged ‘General Aviation Manufacturers Association’

Headed to Airventure? See the GAMA/Build a Plane Glasairs

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

 

Many of you are on your way to AirVenture 2013, and many more of you are planning to head to Oshkosh in just a few days.

Dan Lutgen (left), Julia Garner (center) and a Glasair employee work on a wing.

Dan Lutgen (left), Julia Garner (center) and a Glasair employee work on a wing.

I hope there’s time in your schedule to stop by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association/Build a Plane tent and see for yourself the Glasair Sportsmans (Sportsmen?) that were built by eight teenagers last month. (I blogged the build and you’ll see a complete feature article in the October 2012 issue of AOPA Pilot magazine.)

The teens themselves will be at AirVenture—look for a group of kids in matching T-shirts.

The GAMA/BAP exhibit is 299,  which, according to the map in the Sporty’s app, is right next to Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Hangar A.

See you at AirVenture!

Build a Plane builds two planes: Arlington is go for taxi

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

Moving airplaneI packed my bags and left the Pacific Northwest in the extremely wee hours of June 21, but the work at Glasair Aviation on two airplanes hasn’t slowed down a bit. Today, the teams saw the fruition of all their hard work: The first airplane was fired up.

“The beast has a heart,” Saline High School teacher Ed Redies told me. Taxi had been tentatively planned for June 26, and he said they could’ve made that deadline had they pushed into the early evening. But it was raining—as it is wont to do now and again in Washington state—and rather than stand out in and get wet, the teams opted to wait until today in the hopes that the skies would lighten up a bit. They did—sort of, as you can see from the photo.

The important thing is, the airplane conducted its first taxi test, and an FAA inspection is set to take place on June 28. A first flight could happen on June 30.

Congratulations to the students: Aidan Muir, Kyle LaBombarbe; Lee Lewis Luckhardt; Wyatt Johansen; Julia Garner; Leah Schmitt; Brandon Stripling; and John Deslauriers. Congratulations to their teachers, Dan Lutgen and Ed Redies, who heard about the Build a Plane competition and got their students involved.

If you’re headed to AirVenture 2013, you’ll likely see this airplane on display and you might even meet some of the intrepid young builders. And I guarantee you’ll be as impressed with them as I was.

The fine art of safety wiring

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

WireSome of the teens who are assembling two Glasair aircraft here in Arlington, Wash., come from a farming community. They’ve had their hands dirty working with tractors and other types of equipment for years.

So when they got their lesson in safety wiring, they made a connection between that and repairing fences. They soon learned that the “safety” in “safety wiring” carries a lot of meaning. It’s there to keep all those moving parts from shaking themselves loose (that’s a simplified explanation, but bear with me, builders, please).

Glasair’s Ben Wat carefully safety wired–and then rewired—the bolts on the propeller hub for one of the Build a Plane aircraft, explaining that aviation mechanics take pride in doing this correctly—no loose twists, no sloppy “pigtails.” Just as pilots endure scrutiny from other pilots, mechanics grade each other’s work, I’m guessing.

This is just a tiny taste of the education the GAMA/Build a Plane crew are receiving as they craft two four-place Experimental airplanes. The pride of workmanship will stay with them long after they return home to Minnesota and Michigan.

Build a Plane builds two planes, Day 4: Ready for the wings

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Photo courtesy Dustan Muir

Photo courtesy Dustan Muir

The gleaming wings for the first Build a Plane Glasair are laid out on trestles, waiting to be installed, and that is on today’s agenda.

Every artist signs his work, so it makes perfect sense that the high school students participating in the GAMA/Build a Plane project should sign theirs. That’s what they did, affixing signatures beneath the inspection covers. The operators of these aircraft will see these names at every inspection and recall the two weeks spent here in Arlington, Wash., with a great crew of young people. 

I’m wondering if this is a tradition that every builder shares, much like cutting a shirt tail or dumping water on a student pilot at solo. When you’re building your aircraft, there’s more opportunity to personalize or customize it. What could be a greater source of pride than your own signature affixed to your own handiwork?

The NHL, aviation…or both?

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Aiden Muir gets an airplane ride with Build a Plane's Lyn Freeman. Photo courtesy Dustin Muir

Aiden Muir gets an airplane ride with Build a Plane’s Lyn Freeman. Photo courtesy Dustan Muir

One of these days, if you happen to see Aidan Muir, he may be wearing a National Hockey League uniform. The 6-foot-3-inch forward has been playing since he was 8 years old and is ranked 108th in North America.

This week, however, his heart belongs to general aviation, and hockey has been relegated to the background while he helps to assemble a Glasair Sportsman.

Aidan joined three classmates from Saline High School in Saline, Mich., as well as four students from Canby, Minn., after the two teams won an aviation design competition sponsored by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and Build a Plane. Their prize: an all-expenses-paid trip to Arlington, Wash., to help assemble two airplanes at the Glasair Aviation facility.

After a jam-packed first day working with Glasair mechanics in the company’s Two Weeks to Taxi program, Aidan got an airplane ride yesterday with Build a Plane President Lyn Freeman.

“He loved his ride,” says Aidan’s dad, Dustan, who showed me a cell phone photo his son had sent him. (Dustan is on hand as a chaperone.)

The NHL may lay claim to Aidan some time in the near future. This week and next week, GA is his main focus. And the seed planted this week in Arlington will undoubtedly benefit GA in the future.

Build a Plane builds two planes, Day 3: Nonstop learning

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Ben Rauk (he’s one of three Bens at the Glasair Aviation factory in Arlington, Wash.), starts each day of the Build a Plane/GAMA marathon with a briefing and a “lesson of the day.” Today’s was on safety wiring.

Glasair Aviation's Ben Rauk gives a morning briefing to the Build a Plane participants.

Glasair Aviation’s Ben Rauk gives a morning briefing to the Build a Plane participants.

It might have been totally new territory to the students, but Rauk’s tutorials also proved enlightening to observers who have spent many years in aviation. “I learned something on drilling I didn’t know,” said Mark Van Tine, chief executive officer of Jeppesen, who has been helping to build one of the airplanes. “That’s a nice way to start the day out.”

Glasair and Build a Plane cooperated on the construction of a Sportsman in 2008 with four teens who went through the Two Weeks to Taxi program. This is the first time, however, that the organizations have shepherded eight students working on two airplanes simultaneously. What’s more, a privately owned Sportsman has been in and out of the main hangar while the owner flies off the 40 hours required under the regulations governing homebuilt/experimental aircraft. The near-constant activity in the hangar is a happy soundtrack for general aviation.

Designs from a new generation

Monday, June 10th, 2013

A week from today, two teams of high school students will be rolling up their sleeves to start putting together two Glasair Sportsman 2+2s. The teams, from high schools in Saline, Mich., and Canby, Minn., were the winners of a nationwide aviation design challenge competition sponsored by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and Build A Plane, a nonprofit organization that promotes aviation and aerospace education (and does so through a wide range of activities—which I will discuss in a future blog).

The kids won the challenge by creating an airplane design and test flying a virtual airplane. Lest you think these kids simply plugged some numbers into a program, they went through a monthlong curriculum to get to the design portion. And the software recorded parameters such as time, distance,  fuel efficiency, and more. And their designs were judged and analyzed by a team of aviation engineers.

I thought you’d like to see what these students came up with. Here’s Saline’s design. Can you guess which Experimental airplane served as the inspiration? Extra points if you can name the exact model of that Experimental:

SWWC plane

and a view from the cockpit:

Redies cockpit

 

And here is Canby’s design:

Lutgen rear view

It’ll be fun to see how these kids bridge the gap from the virtual world to the physical process of assembling an airplane. I’ll be there for the first part of the two-week build to bring you the action, and I might even get a chance to do some riveting myself.  Look for more blogs on Reporting Points, plus an article in a future issue of AOPA Pilot.