Posts Tagged ‘general aviation’

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Let’s go to the GoPro! Mia Munselle of Cloverdale, Calif., was minding her own business as she was wandering around her pig pen when she found a pig chewing on a GoPro camera, reports the Telegraph. The camera had footage of two skydivers about to jump as the camera falls to the earth, where it sat for eight months.

A daring helicopter rescue! A critically ill French Antarctic expeditioner aboard the expedition ship L’Astrolabe was rescued by the Tasmania Police and the Westpac Rescue helicopter, reports Mercury News. The boat was located just outside the range of the helicopter, but the pilots were able to make the rescue.

Asleep at the yoke.  An Australian businessman and politician caused flights in Sydney to be diverted after he put his Cessna 210 on autopilot and fell asleep, reports the Sydney Morning Herald. Air traffic controllers made the diversion after being unable to wake the pilot.

It was an interesting flight lesson. A student pilot practicing landings at Massachusetts’ Mansfield Municipal Airport made a landing that was too low, hitting a snow bank at the end of the runway, reports WLNE-TV.  The student was not injured, but the aircraft damage totaled $45,000.

Emergency landings. A pilot made an emergency landing at Washington’s Newman Airport after experiencing engine failure, reports Australia’s ABC News.  A small jet with seven passengers aboard skidded of a runway at Chicago’s  DuPage Airport, but no one was injured, reports the Chicago Sun-Times.

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, February 21st, 2014

I hope they got their Valentine’s Day flowers anyway!  Wesley Berry, CEO of FlowerDeliveryExpress.com had to end an expierment to deliver flowers via a drone after the FAA pulled the plug, reports CBS Detroit.  Berry was informed — nicely — that he needed FAA preauthorization for his delivery service.

Fire!! Firefighters in Abbeville, S.C., were called to the scene of a Beechcraft Baron that caught fire, reports the Index-Journal. The owner of the aircraft had tried to start the Baron after it had sat idle for several years when smoke came out and it caught fire.

It’s raining parts! The FAA is investigating what appears to be a piece of an aircraft that fell on a home on the  flight path of Dulles International Airport, reports Flying.  outside Washington, D.C., last week. No one was injured.

Emergency landings. There were slight injuries to a pilot and their passenger after they made an emergency landing snapping a power pole and landing in a field in Fort Hall, Idaho, reports the Idaho State Journal. A pilot and his passenger walked away after making an emergency landing of a twin-engined Piper aircraft  in a paddock south of Adelaide after the plane lost power, reports Australia’s ABC News. And a twin-engined aircraft made an emergency landing at Wisconsin’s  J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport after experiencing icing on the wings, reports the Post-Crescent.

We’ll end the week with this footage from Flying magazine showing a dramatic Coast Guard helicopter rescue.

 

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, February 14th, 2014

I have the controls. A teenager in Australia with little flight time found himself flying a Piper Cherokee 180 after the pilot passed out, reports AvWeb. The pilot came to and helped the teen land the aircraft at Forbes Field in New South Wales.

Do the crime, do the time. Two men and a woman have pleaded guilty to smuggling immigrants into the United States by private jet, reports NBC San Diego. The immmigrants paid up to $10,000 for the flight. The three face five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

A long walk. A 39-year-old pilot and his 77-year-old father walked 15 miles looking for help after the landing gear, propeller and wing were damaged during an emergency landing 30 miles north of Willcox, Ariz., reports KCTV5 News. A rancher saw the damaged aircraft, called the authorites and rescuers found the son and his father the next day.

Stopped by a fence.  A small aircraft ended up crashing into a fence at Reid-Hillview Airport in San Jose, Calif., reports the San Jose Mercury News. Neither the pilot nor the passenger were injured.

Emergency landings. A pilot made an emergency landing at the Mesquite Municipal Airport in Texas after his 2000 Rans S-6 ES lost one of its three wheels, reports the Mesquite Citizen. A Piper Aztec made an emergency landing in a bay in St. Maarten after both engines dies, reports the Curacao Chronicle. A pilot and his son flying a Piper Super Cub hit a boulder after landing in a field between the Galiuro and Winchester mountain ranges, reports the Wilcox Orange News.

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, February 7th, 2014

I don’t need no stinkin’ propeller! A 79-year-old pilot managed to glide and land his Grumman AA-5 Tiger at an old horse racing track after losing his propeller, reports the Republic. The newspaper reported the propeller cracked and split in two.

Get your beer the old-fashioned way. Minnesota beer brewery Lakemaid was trying out using drones to deliver the adult beverage to ice fishers on Mille Lacs Lake, but the FAA has nixed the plan, reports CNN. The agency said that it’s against the law to fly drones for commercial purposes or above 400 feet in the United States.

Eject!! A Royal Canadian Air Force instructor pilot and a student were forced to eject from their CT-156 Harvard II trainer after a landing gear malfunction, reports AvWeb. The problem was discovered when another trainer did a visual inspection of the aircraft.

 

Emergency landings. A pilot made an emergency landing of his Cirrus SR-22 in a Worth County, Ga., cornfield, reports WorthIt2U.net. A private plane carrying seven passengers made an emergency landing at Bluegrass Airport after experiencing engine failure. reports Lex18.com. A flight instructor and his student made an emergency landing at Australia’s Orange Airport, reports Central Western Daily.

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, January 31st, 2014

I feel the need…the need for speed. The Daily Mail has posted a heart-pounding video that gives a glimpse of what it’s like to fly an RAF Typhoon jet. During the video, the supersonic jet flew from a low of 250 feet and a high of 40,000 feet

Was Road Runner there too? Kentucky Lt. Gov. Jerry Abramson had a good excuse for being late to a speech before he Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce’s Rooster Boosterbreakfast — a coyote on the runway, reports AviationPros.com.  As Abramson’s aircraft was landing at  Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport, it had to do a gor-around because of a coyote on the runway.

Do the crime, do the time. John Quinn of Rutland, Vt. pleaded guilty to stealing high-speed carbide drill bits and other aviation-related tools from GE Aviation, reports the Republic. Quinn received more than $108,000 from the proceeds of sales via the Internet.

Happy landings. No one was injured when a small Cessna slid off the runway at Winchester Regional Airport while doing touch-and-go landings, reports the Republic. A small aircraft made an emergency landing in a bean field near Huntland, Tenn., after the engine failed, reports WHNT-TV. No 0ne was injured when a TBM7 made an emergency landing at Sioux Gateway Airport with landing gear issues, reports the Sioux City Journal.

 

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, January 24th, 2014

But it looked so real! A viral video that allegedly shows a large aircraft crashing into a bridge has been determined as a fake, reports Epoch Times. The video shows the crash, complete with smoke, fire, and a person falling off the bridge.

Cash wasn’t king. Conor Guckian paid $20,000 in cash to charter a private jet for a flight from Nashville to California. The police were tipped off and went to the airport to investigate, reports News Channel 5. When the K-9 unit used dogs to sniff Guckian’s money, they detected a narcotic odor. When they searched the jet, they found another $153,000 in cash.

Let’s go to the video! A New Zealand pilot and his passenger were forced to make an emergency landing on Martin’s Bay Beach after the engine quit, reports AvWeb. After finding and repairing a fuel system blockage and taking off, the aircraft was covered in a spray of water.

Upside down helicopter. Soft snow on a glacier near New Zealand’s Mt Cook caused a helicopter to topple over after a wayward landing, reports the New Zealand Herald. The four tourists aboard were not hurt.

Helicopters to the rescue. A sailor was rescued by the Coast Guard near Piedras Blancas in California after his boat crashed into the rocks, reports the Cambrian. Two men were rescued by a New York Police Department helicopter after they got stuck in the marsh, reports the New York Post.

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, January 17th, 2014

The highway became a runway. A pilot and two passengers were forced to make an emergency landing on New York’s Major Deegan Expressway in the Bronx after an engine malfunction, reports NBC New York. No one was injured and the Piper PA had minor damage.

A different interpretation of getting high. Despite an effort to fly under the radar, federal and Lawrence County, Utah, authorities were suspicious of  pilot Ken Barton Burrows, who was detained after landing at New Castle Airport, reports the Ellwood City Ledger. After inspecting his single-engine Cessna, Dept. of Homeland Security officers found 240 lbs of marijuana worth nearly $1.2 million on board.

Ignorance of the law is no excuse. Andrew Decker, says he didn’t know that pointing a laser at a helicopter was dangerous, reports WESH-TV. The teen, who allegedly pointed a laser in in the cockpit of a sheriff’s helicopter as it flew over his neighborhood,  faces a felony charge.

Helicopters to the rescue! Two Tampa police helicopter pilots made a dramatic rescue of a pilot whose airplane had just crashed  as it approached Tampa International Airport, reports the Tampa Bay Times. A California Highway Patrol helicopter rescued a glider pilot who ended up trapped in a 50-foot tree, reports CBS San Francisco.

Good landings.  The Coast Guard rescued two passengers after their airplane went down off the coast near California’s Catalina Island, reports KPCC Radio. A pilot was not injured after he made an emergency landing of his ultralight aircraft in a field in Odessa, Texas, reports the Odessa American.

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, January 10th, 2014

He could have just used skates. Helicopter pilot Bradley Friesen has defended a stunt where he “skated” his aircraft between two groups of players in Canada’s North Shore Mountains and shot video of it, reports CTV News. He defended the stunt, saying that the video had been “carefully staged” with proper safety briefings.

Do the crime, do the time. Commercial aircraft restoration group B-25 Group, LLC has agreed to pay the government $55,000 after removing parts from an F-82 Twin Mustang that crashed in Fairbanks, Alaska back in 1950, reports the Daily News-Miner. The agreement ends five years of litigation.

It’s all about survival. A pilot and two passengers managed to make an emergency landing at Montana’s Glacier Park International Airport after icing caused the airplane to stall, reports the Spokesman-Review. No one was injured when a private jet with country singer Dwight Yokam made an emergency landing after the pilot reported a fire in the Hawker 800, reports TheBoot.com.

Helicopter rescues. After a series of explosions at the construction side of a student housing complex in downtown Kingston, Ontario, a helicopter operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force rescued a crane operator trapped in the fire, reports AvWeb. A man who was kicked off a mountain in Puerto Rico by a goat was rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter, reports ABC News.

 

6 favorite AOPA Online stories in 2013

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

As editors, we here at AOPA have a wonderful job, getting to tell the great stories of our members. As the newest member of the team, I had the chance to interview some amazing people, so below are my six favorite stories from 2013, in order.

1.  I’ve been in love with aviation since I was six. And growing up as the daughter of a non-flying Air Force officer, I had access to aviation that many African-Americans of my generation didn’t have. Even before coming to AOPA, I worked to make aviation more diverse, which is why my Oct. 1 story on Delaware State University, a historically black college and university based in Dover, is a special favorite. The university, which traces its aviation training roots back to the Tuskegee Airman in World War II, has officially been training aviation professionals in its flight program since 1987. It is also the only HBCU aviation program that owns and operates its own aircraft fleet. Only about two percent of professional pilots in the United States are African-American, said Capt. Stephen Speed, the school’s aviation program director.

2.  AOPA member Will Davis discussed how he was able to continue his flight lessons after a video of him clipping an SUV as he was landing during his first cross country solo went viral worldwide. Despite that, he got his certificate on Feb. 2, as I wrote back on Feb. 27.  I heard from him recently, and he said that he tries to fly at least once a month, with plans to fly more when he gets the time. He also thanked everyone for their encouragement and support during that difficult time and after.

3.  Talk about inspiration – a father inspired his daughter to go through a second harrowing liver transplant by promising to buy her the airplane of her dreams after she made it through the surgery and recovery. Thirty-year-old Julie DeStefano comes from a family of pilots, including herself, her brother and her father, Dennis, who both own aircraft, as I reported in my March 27 story. Dennis recently reported  that Julie send him and her mother on several reconnaissance missions to Monte Vista and Alamosa, Colo., and Taos, N.M., to look at potential tail draggers, to no avail. “Then in May she located her dream plane in Knox County, Ohio. On June 14 I flew her there to take delivery of N7679E, a really clean 1958 Champion Model 7FC,” he said.

4.  On Aug. 12, I wrote about 20-year-old Jennifer Guetterman, who won a free trip to France and participated as the only American among 75 racers in the Tour Aérien Des Jeunes Pilotes, which ran July 15-28. The event was created to motivate the next generation of pilots and promote general aviation to the public, and Guetterman’s trip was funded by AOPA, the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations, and the Fédération Française Aéronautique. Since the tour, she said, she has continued to teach Ground School at AFI Flight Training Center at Fullerton Airport. “I am one semester away from my Associate of Science, Commercial Pilot degree at Cypress College and my Instrument Rating check ride should be in January,” she said. “I have kept in touch with my French pilot friends and plan on returning to France to visit during the next tour.”

5.  Sixteen years to the day after getting his student pilot license, Glen Wenzel, recipient of the Erral Lea Plymate Memorial flight training scholarship in 2012, passed his checkride and got his private pilot certificate on July 31. My story was published on Aug. 8.  He is a career firefighter in Winston-Salem, N.C. His father was a pilot, and he has been around aviation his whole life, taking his first flight at age four.  An AOPA member since 2010, Wenzel said that learning to fly has been a lifelong goal. After his father died in a helicopter accident, Wenzel inherited his Cessna 150. “That made it easier to do my training, despite the unfortunate circumstances,” he said. “Inheriting his plane made it even more important to finish my flight training.” Since then, he said he’s been trying to do as much flying as he can. “I’m going to try to get my instrument license next year some time. I’ve mostly been flying out to the beach and up to Jersey to see family,” said Wenzel. “Hopefully next year will bring an instrument and maybe a commercial ticket.”

6.  Seven employees at Woodinville, Wash.-based Dynon Avionics who formed the Swamp Creek Flying Club, including CEO Robert Hamilton, built a Glasair Sportsman under its Two Weeks To Taxi program for their club aircraft. I covered the story on April 1. Kirk Kleinholz, a CFII sales manager for Dynon and a club member, says the original members are still in the club, and that the aircraft has been performing well.  Two members flew it to AirVenture this year and parked it with other GlassAirs. “We also use it to visit Dynon’s business partners, and it was on display at the Golden West Fly-In,” he said. “It’s truly been a thrill to have our own aircraft.”

Strange but true general aviation news

Friday, December 27th, 2013

These drugs just fell from the sky!  Officials at Hull Prison near Ottawa, Ontario, are beefing up security after a drone was able to drop a package that allegedly was filled with drugs, reports AvWeb. The package was never recovered.

Speaking of drones… Samy Kamkar, a computer programmer, has released a set of free instructions showing how a toy Parrot drone can be turned into a “skyhacker” drone, reports AvWeb. It can then interfere with WiFi-controlled drones and take control of them.

This spa wasn’t so relaxing. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency raided the offices of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based  charter operator World Jet as part of a drug trafficking case, reports the Durango Herald. The company allegedly used The Springs Resort & Spa in Pagosa Springs, Colo., to launder money for the operation.

Helicopter to the rescue. An 18-year-old cliff jumping the waters off Tasmania’s Blackmans Bay Beach had to be rescued by helicopter after he injured his back after falling 26 feet into the water, reports ABC News.

A safe landing is a good landing. A pilot flying from Maine’s Portland International Jetport to Waterville was forced to make an emergency landing on I295 after allegedly running out of fuel, reports Flying magazine. A Beechcraft BE-200 used by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo made an emergency landing after the landing gear failed to deploy, reports the Wall Street Journal.