Tom Horne

Slots and Heat

July 13, 2014 by Thomas A. Horne, Editor At Large

For yesterday’s departure from Hong Kong each airplane in the group was assigned a slot. These ranged from 7:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. so it was important for us to all get to the airport well in advance. Hong Kong, with departures occurring at what must be one-minute intervals, is a very, very busy place.

In any event, our carefully allotted slot times didn’t work out as planned. Like many big airports overseas, at Hong Kong you have to call up clearance delivery, then ground control to get an engine start time. The first time I called up, I was told to expect a 10-minute wait for engine start. Ten minutes came and went, and the next callup said it would be 15 minutes. Then 20 minutes. Then 25 minutes.

This was bad not just because of the takeoff delay, but because of the weather. It was a soggy, rainy, 90-degree morning, so everyone ended up soaked in sweat waiting for permission to start. We didn’t dare start the engines so we could sit there indefinitely, even though that would have given us air conditioning. It would eat up fuel.

Finally, permission was granted. A half-hour taxi ensued, then our Mustang was finally cleared for takeoff. It was 10:30 a.m.

The intial takeoff and climb performance was OK, with climb rates of 2,000 fpm or so. But the much higher than standard temperature conditions (ISA +19 degrees) meant that to keep decent climb rates we’d have to use ever-slower airspeeds. Eventually we levelled off at FL330 (we gave up on cruising at the originally-filed FL370, feeling that it would take us too long to reach it). Coming up on the target altitude, the Mustang’s climb rate was down to 500 fpm owing to the heat’s adverse effects on engine power output.

Less power available also meant a slower cruise speed than typical–315 instead of 340 KTAS. All these factors turned what normally would have been a 1.5 hour trip into a 2 hour event. We landed at Taipei’s Tao Yuan International Airport at 12:30 p.m. Later in the day there was an outing to a huge electronics store, and today the group visited a Tao temple, Chiang Kai Shek’s memorial, the National Revolutionary Martyrs’ Shrine–for those who died fighting warlords, communists, and the Japanese in the period from the 1920s to the late 1940s.

But this trip is all about getting there, so there’s another briefing tonight for tomorrow’s trip to Jeju, South Korea.

Here’s a view of our route:

The route to Jeju may involve some rain showers and convection. That's tropical weather in the summer for you!

The route to Jeju may involve some rain showers and convection. That’s tropical weather in the summer for you!

Here’s some shots from yesterday’s flight:

Waiting for engine start on the ramp at Hong Kong's Business Aviation Center. There's a Signature FBO here!

Waiting for engine start on the ramp at Hong Kong’s Business Aviation Center, with a big downpour on the way.

Baking in the heat, waiting for engine-start permission so I can close the door and start up. Outside the western world, general aviation pilots will find that  wearing a pilot uniform will mean bring better influence and respect.

Baking in the heat, waiting for engine-start permission so I can close the door and start up. 

The Mustang's G1000 MFD shows us enroute to Taipei, and more than halfway there.

The Mustang’s G1000 MFD shows us enroute to Taipei, and more than halfway there.

Two of the group's airplanes tied down on the ramp at Taipei.

Three of the group’s airplanes tied down on the ramp at Taipei–a Twin Commander, A Citation ISP, and a PC-12NG

 

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