Flying A Route of Early Settlers

November 24, 2011 by Craig Fuller

Thanksgiving morning here in Frederick, Maryland was, well…picture perfect!  There was the promise of some wind, but it was a great day to launch my Husky.  Since the day has everything to do with our early settlers, I thought a trip along the Potomac River might be appropriate.

Anyone who has visited Washington, D.C. knows the Potomac runs right through our Nation’s Capital out to the Chesapeake Bay.  But, traveling just a short distance from Frederick, you can reach the Potomac and head away from Washington (a far better idea unless you enjoy military aircraft off your wing). 

The Potomac heads out to historic Harper’s Ferry.  It is at this point that the Potomac and the Shenandoah rivers come together. 

There you find a National Park that is described by the Park Service as follows: THE HISTORY OF HARPERS FERRY HAS FEW PARALLELS IN THE AMERICAN DRAMA. It is more than one event, one date, or one individual. It is multi-layered – involving a diverse number of people and events that influenced the course of our nation’s history. Harpers Ferry witnessed the first successful application of interchangeable manufacture, the arrival of the first successful American railroad, John Brown’s attack on slavery, the largest surrender of Federal troops during the Civil War, and the education of former slaves in one of the earliest integrated schools in the United States.

To view the complete story from the National Park Service, CLICK HERE.

As you follow the Potomac further West, railroad bridges cast shadows on the water.

Looking for a place to land for a cup of coffee, I noticed I was not far from the community of Bedford, Pennsylvania.  This community is the site of the Bedford Springs Resort.  Originally, the resort offered guests in the 1800′s healing waters from the natural springs.  Today, guests have many more options, including golf and other types of liquid enjoyment.  It is a beautiful resort and one we have visited when the Fall colors are at their height and that is a wonderful time to be in Bedford!.

I did get my coffee at the Bedford airport, but no one was around.  So, N24HU departed and climbed to 5,500 where the air was smooth and the tailwind provided a ground speed above 150 knots.

All this, and I was home in time to stuff the turkey!

We have much to be thankful for and this flight reminded me of just how many have toiled to establish and protect the freedoms we enjoy today.

I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving!

If you would like to see a short slide show from the flight, CLICK HERE.

4 Responses to “Flying A Route of Early Settlers”

  1. John McKenna Says:

    Craig Fuller through his “real” engagement with the fun side of flying is putting the best foot forward for AOPA and aviation. Just wished it wasn’t my job to make sure uncle Terry didn’t get out of line on Turkey Day & instead I too could have gone flying.

  2. Marc Maylor Says:

    Nice photos! Our area down here in South Carolina looks very similar, I guess thats the east coast for you. At times it makes me miss the west coast of California, where the combination of oceans and mountains can be pretty spectacular. I also went flying on Thanksgiving Day, the weather was just to nice to pass up, although I didn’t home in time to stuff the turkey, and in fact I was late! But it was worth it, given the oportunity I’d do it again.

  3. Marc Maylor Says:

    Nice photos! Our area down here in South Carolina looks very similar, I guess thats the east coast for you. At times it makes me miss the west coast of California, where the combination of oceans and mountains can be pretty spectacular. I also went flying on Thanksgiving Day, the weather was just to nice to pass up, although I didn’t get home in time to stuff the turkey, and in fact I was late! But it was worth it, given the oportunity I’d do it again.

  4. Mick Olbough Says:

    Great article guys, and some beautiful pics. Thinking about taking a trip to Harper’s Ferry sometime this year, so this has certainly given me some food for thought!

Leave a Reply

*